Lighthouses of Australia Project - JANUARY 00 BULLETIN
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Dear Friends

This one is lucky to be here

Not an incident free couple of weeks. What was that about some planets aligning?

Everything culminated in a hard drive that was behaving like a sinking ship and when the captain was given the orders that she was about to go he decided he wasn't going down with her.

Thanks to Tim and the team at West Coast Computers for getting me up and running with a new hard drive and the support to save nearly everything off the old one. Especially, being a great believer in backup, as I am always telling my clients and friends??

So better late than never, here it is.

Part 2 of SA Trips

This month concludes our South Australian trip with the final part of the report from Deborah.

Ed arriving at Troubridge Shoal. [Photograph: Deborah Taylor]
Ed arriving at Troubridge Shoal.
[Photograph: Deborah Taylor]


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Feel free to post any request, letters, notices here regarding research, events etc. for any Australian Lighthouse on this notice board.

<keeper@lighthouses.org.au>


South Australian Expedition Report: (Part 2 of 2)

Part 1: Apr 2000 Bulletin

[by Deborah Taylor]

Day 4: Tuesday 28.3.2000

Looking forward to a big day today but awoke to find the weather had changed to a light but steady rain with mist. Malcolm called Chris Johnson, our guide, about the prospects of getting to Troubridge Island today but Chris said the weather was promising at his end though it may change fairly quickly.

First stop for the morning is for Malcolm's interview with the regional ABC radio station, 5MG.

First stop for the morning is a roadside café at Ardrossan to ask for a landline for Malcolm's interview with the regional ABC radio station, 5MG. Smithy and I are banished to the car with our coffee while Malcolm sits calmly with his back to the window to avoid us cheering him on [?] Unfortunately we were tuned to the wrong station so we missed the interview. But we did learn a lot about some fellow who flew a biplane around Australia. Apparently the interview was very successful so much so that he would be asked again for another interview the following day with the another regional ABC radio station South Australia Broken Hill.

On our way now to Edithburgh a small town situated at the south eastern tip of Yorke Peninsula, the weather has improved quite dramatically to a warm sunny day. As we approach the town Malcolm points us to Troubridge Island - it seems so far away.

Looking towards Troubridge Shoal. [Photograph: Ed Kavaliunas]
Looking towards Troubridge Shoal.
[Photograph: Ed Kavaliunas]

Now if you read our Tasmanian journal you may remember a certain boat trip through Hell's Gates at Strahan --- that thing about little boats on lots of water. Of course Malcolm and Smithy think this is a huge joke and fill my head with all sorts of scenarios while I quietly try to calculate how many hours it will take to putt putt our way across the water, not to mention the weather changing etc.

We find the street where Chris lives and runs his Fishing Charter business. After greetings and some conservation he asks us to park out the front so we can follow him to the boat ramp. Well can you imagine when Chris emerged from the driveway in his four-wheel drive towing a beautiful big boat that loomed over the top of his car; it was like that part of the movie where everything goes in slow motion. Malcolm and Smithy snitched on my little concerns, Chris laughed and said if he had known that he would have brought the dinghy. Ha ha.

Ed arriving at Troubridge Shoal. [Photograph: Deborah Taylor]
Ed arriving at Troubridge Shoal.
[Photograph: Deborah Taylor]

Troubridge Island is actually a shoal and as such changes its shape, so where the lighthouse and its residence once stood in the middle of the island it now stands precariously on the edge. However much work has been done and is still being done to protect the structures from the sea.

Chris anchors the boat as close to the shore as possible and we wade through the crystal clear water to the beach. As the water surrounding the island is so shallow and the sand is so light it gives the illusion of a tropical island. Smithy gets to work looking for angles and setting up equipment and Malcolm is busy with fact finding and soaking up the scene while I'm busy with my compulsive scrounging for old bits of broken china and shells- this is heaven for all of us.

Chris, Deb and Malcolm at Troubridge Shoal. [Photograph: Ed Kavaliunas]
Chris, Deb and Malcolm at Troubridge Shoal.
[Photograph: Ed Kavaliunas]

Chris tells us of the history and mystery surrounding the families who lived here, the tragedies and the humour. As well, the island is home to a colony of penguins and shags. The Keepers residence is maintained for accommodation and as it was currently occupied by holiday makers we didn't have the chance to see inside but that didn't matter as we had plenty to occupy us.


It was such a lovely day we all would have liked to have stayed longer but as usual our itinerary was fairly tight so we headed back to the mainland. We would like to thank Chris for donating his time and making available his [big] boat for this project and thanks for the bits of china too.

Chris Johnson at the helm on our trip to Troubridge Shoal. [Photograph: Deborah Taylor]
Chris Johnson at the helm on our trip to Troubridge Shoal.
[Photograph: Deborah Taylor]

The next stop was the Edithburgh Museum where Meredith Clifford was expecting us; she was very helpful with information and photographs of Troubridge Island and invited us to photograph some of the relics. A very interesting well laid out museum and worth the visit if you are passing through one day. Next, a well-earned cup of coffee then off to Troubridge Hill Lighthouse.

The all red brick Troubridge Hill Lighthouse. [Photograph: Ed Kavaliunas]
The all red brick Troubridge Hill Lighthouse.
[Photograph: Ed Kavaliunas]

A bit of a drive along the coast and the weather has changed dramatically to cold and windy and the sea has turned black. Troubridge Hill Lighthouse looks like an industrial chimney stack in the middle of nowhere, though it must be said that it is beautifully made and of red bricks. Apparently it was built to half way when the builder decided it was not quite right and so demolished it and began all over again. Smithy finds a few different angles including one that is a little too close to the edge of the cliff for our comfort, sometimes we really have to keep an eye on him.

The Troubridge Hill Lighthouse on the scenic South Yorke Peninsula Coast. [Photograph: Annette Flottwell]
The Troubridge Hill Lighthouse on the scenic South Yorke Peninsula Coast.
[Photograph: Annette Flottwell]

Well it was good to get back into the car and out of the wind as we headed for Marion Bay to find accommodation for the night.

Day 5: Wednesday 29.3.2000

Malcolm was asked again for another interview the following day with the another regional ABC radio station South Australia Broken Hill.

Arrived at Innes National Park around 9am and made our way to the local café to ask for a landline for the ABC interview. Smithy and I are again banished to the car with our coffee, but this time we are listening to the right radio station and are most impressed with how Malcolm succinctly put forward the aims of the project and entertained listeners with some funny anecdotes about lighthouses - we think he's a potential star!

The Cape Spencer Lighthouse. [Photograph: Brian Lord]
The Cape Spencer Lighthouse.
[Photograph: Brian Lord]

Malcolm and Ed At Cape Spencer looking towards Althorpe Island. [Photograph: Deborah Taylor]
Malcolm and Ed At Cape Spencer looking towards Althorpe Island.
[Photograph: Deborah Taylor]

First call is Cape Spencer, which is the replacement for Althorpes, quite a stunning outlook across the sea to the island and rugged cliffs behind us.

The stainless steel West Cape Lighthouse. [Photograph: Ed Kavaliunas]
The stainless steel West Cape Lighthouse.
[Photograph: Ed Kavaliunas]

Round to West Cape which is supposed to be a twenty minute walk from the car park- somebody's joke- we think. West Cape Lighthouse looks like a giant potbelly stove atop high cliffs and scrubby vegetation. And how come we had to carry all the stuff back? It's the last time we fall for that ' you take all that with you and I'll catch up' routine Smithy.

The West Cape Lighthouse and solar panel. [Photograph: Ed Kavaliunas]
The West Cape Lighthouse and solar panel.
[Photograph: Ed Kavaliunas]

Back to the Trading Post, where we had the radio interview, for a quick lunch [very nice too] before moving on to Corny Point Lighthouse. This is the last lighthouse to photograph, it is a beautiful old light that the handful of locals who live here have fought hard and successfully to preserve as a working light.

The Corny Point Lighthouse. [Photograph: Ed Kavaliunas]
The Corny Point Lighthouse.
[Photograph: Ed Kavaliunas]

There is no trace of the Keepers residence at all as it was demolished years ago. However Malcolm did find a Stumpy Tail lizard during his search and we invited the little fellow to join us on our traditional 'last light' group shot.

'Corny', the Corny Point Lizard. [Photograph: Ed Kavaliunas]
'Corny', the Corny Point Lizard.
[Photograph: Ed Kavaliunas]

Corny Point, The final lighthouse. [Photograph: Ed Kavaliunas]
Corny Point, The final lighthouse.
[Photograph: Ed Kavaliunas]

The next stop on is Moonta an old copper mining town some two hours away. Time is catching up with us a bit, but we are on our way to visit Jim Harbison who is the local historian and has some valuable information about the Tipara Reef Lighthouse. As we arrived fairly late in the afternoon we didn't have as much time as we would have liked to spend with Jim and his wife Betty but we did receive a lot of the information we needed and are very grateful, thank you Jim.

The old Tipara Reef Lighthouse was eventually dismantled due to deterioration. [Photograph Courtesy: Bob Duthie]
The old Tipara Reef Lighthouse was eventually dismantled due to deterioration.
[Photograph Courtesy: Bob Duthie]

Former Tipara Lightship keepers grave at Moonta Cemetery. [Photograph: Ed Kavaliunas]
Former Tipara Lightship keepers grave at Moonta Cemetery.
[Photograph: Ed Kavaliunas]

As the light was fading rapidly he directed us to the cemetery to photograph the original Keeper's grave and the old Keeper's residence. We felt bad that we didn't have the chance to take a shot of Jim but thanks very much to Ron Co of Moonta for taking the time to do it for us.

Jim Harbison gave us a lot of information on the old Tipara Reef Lighthouse. [Photograph: Ron Co]
Jim Harbison gave us a lot of information on the old Tipara Reef Lighthouse.
[Photograph: Ron Co]

Well darkness has descended with a thud; we are at the end of our Daylight Saving Time now so it takes a bit of adjusting to a six o'clock nightfall. It is a bit of a scramble to find accommodation for the night, as all the caravan parks are full. We decide to try our luck at the pub and found the people at the Cornwall Hotel were very helpful and what luxury!

Day 6: Thursday 30.3.2000

Early morning at the breakfast room we decide to have our toast and coffee [tea] on the balcony over looking the main street and watching the early morning parade of the town beginning a new day. One of life's little luxuries, don't you think? The morning sees us making our way towards Adelaide for tomorrow's final business.

A quick stop at Snowtown to check out the second hand shop. Malcolm is very understanding about our addictions, my endless search for vintage fabrics and Smithy's for old cameras. But then we put up with his snoring, so I guess you would call it a trade off.

For lunch we stopped at Clare Valley and for a bit of a look around before driving on to Burra, which is another old mining town. With a little time on our hands we decided to do the tourist thing and visit the old goal where they filmed the movie Breaker Morant and do some sightseeing around the old mines and miner's dugouts.

It is a beautiful autumn afternoon as we approach the Barossa Valley, South Australia's premier wine district. It is our intention to find accommodation for the night. However, we didn't count on four thousand Ulysses bikers beating us to it. It happens that it was their annual convention. I ask you, how can three lowly lighthouse people compete with four thousand veteran bikers? Do what they used to be told, I suppose, move on to the next town.

Ah Gumeracha. Yes even the spell checker is questioning this one. However you pronounce it, the Publican took pity on us so we found a nice place to stay - along with a few happy Ulyssians in party mode. Smithy wishes to apologize for that dinky song on the duke box that accidentally found its way into his considered selection. I told him not to worry, since I was the only girl, everyone probably thought it was me.

Day 7: Friday 31.3.2000

The altar of St. Peters Cathedral. [Photograph: Ed Kavaliunas]
The altar of St. Peters Cathedral.
[Photograph: Ed Kavaliunas]

From Gumeracha we travel back towards Port Adelaide with a stop at St. Peter's Cathedral, Adelaide, for Smithy to photograph and then on to meet Chris Browne at Ports Corp. who also has valuable information and some rare photos to show us. Like me, Chris is a collector and hoarder and saves relics, even little fragments of history from the places he's been to. It never ceases to surprise me how generous people are with what they have and Chris was no exception. We would like to thank him for sending us the photos we were interested in, plus a few extras.

Finally time for a bit of lunch back at Port Adelaide. Oops! Who forgot the time? Not Malcolm that's for sure - blame it on the antique dealer who sold me that irresistible antique christening gown! Poor Malcolm had to scoff his lunch down in order to be on time to meet up with Andrew the curator of the photographic collection at the Maritime Museum. Sorry.

Malcolm and Alan Foote with the restored canon at AMSA. [Photograph: Ed Kavaliunas]
Malcolm and Alan Foote with the restored canon at AMSA.
[Photograph: Ed Kavaliunas]

Next we make our way back to visit AMSA again to see Alan Foote to borrow some photos and take a shot [no pun intended] of the cannon. The barrel is the original signal cannon from Troubridge Island and the wooden carriage was rebuilt from the original plans at the AMSA workshop. We mention the restoration of it's twin at Cape Borda in the March 2000 Bulletin. We would also like to thank the people at AMSA particularly Alan for their help, their time and their enthusiasm.

More of the collection of lighthouse artifacts on display at AMSA. [Photograph: Ed Kavaliunas]
More of the collection of lighthouse artifacts on display at AMSA.
[Photograph: Ed Kavaliunas]

After our meeting with Alan we headed back into town but not before investigating a particular little second hand shop at Largs Bay that turned out to be a little gold mine of collectable things like the vintage fabrics and old dolls that I collect and an old print of a sailing ship. By the time I came out of there, Malcolm and Smithy were thinking of hiring a trailer. The elderly man who owned the place was so nice too.

The afternoon was coming to a close, leaving Adelaide behind; we made our way to the Adelaide Hills for the night. On finding some good old-fashioned pub rooms and a hearty meal at Mt. Barker, we settled in, with Smithy and Malcolm glued to the football on television and me gloating over my treasures.


Day 8: Saturday 1.4.2000

Pinch and a punch for the first of the month. Saturday morning in Hahndorf a quaint little old German town, wondering up and down the street - what a pleasant way to spend a Saturday morning. Heading homeward now, making our way towards Naracoorte near the border of South Australia and Victoria. Of coarse, there is no room at the inn, because there is a horse carnival, and a band competition in town! As the time is approaching 5 pm we decide to try our luck at finding the famous bat caves to see if they are still open. As luck would have it they were, so we managed to get in on the last tour. Very interesting indeed.

Edenhope, home again, in our own state. After a bit of running around the Edenhope Hotel found some room for us and a good meal as well. Smithy and Malcolm are glued to the television, watching the football again, while I'm - well, stuck there too.

Day 9: Sunday 2.4.2000

Well did anyone think to check the petrol gauge? Hmmm? No they didn't, did they! Just as well that little 'out in the middle of nowhere' caravan park sold petrol, isn't it?

Making our way to Hall's Gap in the Grampians, with a quick[?] walk down to the MacKenzies Waterfall, then into town for lunch before heading out past Ararat way to visit Malcolm's two sisters. Then begins the long and final road home to our part of the coast - Ocean Grove.

On our trip we met some great people along the way. We would like to thank them all, not only for their help, but for going out of their way to make their time available to us. We had a lot of fun and traveled many kilometres across a beautiful state.

Thank you South Australia.

Deborah. [Photograph: Ed Kavaliunas]
Deborah.
[Photograph: Ed Kavaliunas]
eMail Deborah

Malcolm. [Photograph: Deborah Taylor]
Malcolm.
[Photograph: Deborah Taylor]
eMail Malcolm
Smithy (aka Ed). [Photograph: Deborah Taylor]
Smithy (aka Ed).

[Photograph: Deborah Taylor]
eMail Ed

P.S. Malcolm apologizes for all of his typos in the last bulletin!

Editors Note: No he doesn't!!


Department of Scrounge:

If anybody has any of this material on any Australian lighthouses including the ones listed at the Department of Scrounge it would appreciated, especially the high priority ones:

  • Original Colour Photographs
  • Historical Photographs or Postcards
  • History, experiences and anecdotes
  • Technical History

Please eMail <Keeper>


New Pages for Australia:

The Troubridge Hill Lighthouse near Edithburgh The Troubridge Hill Lighthouse near EdithburghNew.gif (158 bytes)
The Cape Spencer LighthouseNew.gif (158 bytes) The Cape Spencer Lighthouse
The Corny Point Lighthouse The Corny Point LighthouseNew.gif (158 bytes)

If your e-mail does not display in HTML these pages can be accessed from the "New Listing for Month Index" at <http://www.lighthouses.org.au/lights/New/Index%20New.htm>


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If your e-mail does not display in HTML these pages can be accessed from the "New Listing for Month Index" at <http://www.lighthouses.org.au/lights/New/Index%20New.htm>


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If your e-mail does not display in HTML these pages can be accessed from the "New Listing for Month Index" at <http://www.lighthouses.org.au/lights/New/Index%20New.htm>


Australian News:

Any news or articles regarding Australian Lighthouses most welcome.


Thanks to the Following People for Their Help in April:

Jim Harbison (info)
Chris Browne (photos)
Frans la Poutré (info)
Adrian Howard (photos)
Ron Co (photos)
Sally Grundy (info)
Peter Gordon (info)
Michael Collinson (photo)
Beverley Atkins (info)
Doug Inall (photo)
Will. Smith (info & photo)
Linc Castle ( photos)
Robert Cook (info)

Thanks to all the people who have put links to the site

Thanks to those who let me use their photos for thumbnails.


Regards until the June 2000 Bulletin
Malcolm Macdonald

http://www.lighthouses.org.au/lights/


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