Lighthouses of Australia Project - OCTOBER 00 BULLETIN
NOVEMBER 2001

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Dear Friends

Features

Lighthouses From the Air: Part 3
Preview of New Lighthouse Book

Letters & Notices

Department of Scrounge

New Pages & Links

New Pages for Australia
New Links for Australia
New Links for World

Australian News

Montague 120th Celebrations
Cape Willoughby 150th
Deal Island Voyage
Eddystone Point Clean Up

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Dear Friends

Sorry the Bulletin is a bit late this month. I have been struggling a bit with my health and took a long overdue non-lighthouse holiday up the country to listen to good music, catch up with old friends and relatives. certainly feeling a lot better for it now,.

ALA & LoA to Come Together

We will have some really exciting news next month regarding the future of the Australian Lighthouse Association (ALA) and Lighthouses of Australia Inc (LoA Inc).

The Australian Lighthouse Association.It has seemed superfluous that with the establishment of LoA Inc that there should be 2 organisations representing and working for the promotion, preservation and protection of lighthouse in Australia.

New coffee table format book about Australian lighthouses.For about 6 month there have been negotiations to bring the resources of these 2 groups together.

We are now at the threshold of bringing the 2 groups together and will bring you a full report in next month's bulletin.

The 3rd installment of Lloyd and Winsomes' epic journey around Australia by air.This Months Bulletin In Brief

The 2 main features articles this month are the 3rd installment of Lloyd and Winsomes' epic journey around Australia by air, photographing our lights and the book review of a very exciting new coffee table format book about Australian lighthouses.

The Montague 120th anniversary celebrations.News covers the Montague 120th anniversary celebrations held last month and gives details of the upcoming Cape Willoughby 150th anniversary celebrations.

The upcoming Cape Willoughby 150th anniversary celebrations.Also covered is the Deal Island Voyage to further clean up and carry out restoration work on the island and plans for an Eddystone Point clean up.

Future of Our Lights to Be Featured on Australian TV

We believe at this stage that on Saturday, Dec 1st, 2001, a short feature will be shown on Channel 9's Saturday Today Show at 9am.

The feature will look at the future of our Australian lights as a result of automation and demanning.

It is hoped to feature former keepers and has some footage of the Montague 120th and the upcoming Cape Byron 100th.

It seems that an interview will be done with our committee member Ian Clifford and perhaps, but not confirmed, myself.

Project's 4th Anniversary Next Month

December 2002 marks the 4th anniversary of the establishment of the Lighthouses of Australia Project. We will also be publishing the 48th Monthly Bulletin!

Even though many people feel we have made great strides I can assure you that is has been a hard and sometimes frustrating haul. I certainly wouldn't have got things this far with out the many friends and supporters I that have helped me alaong the way.

It is all the more the reason why I need you to pledge your support by joining LoA Inc and getting actively involved.

Malcolm Macdonald is the founder and convener of Lighthouses of Australia
Malcolm Macdonald
Bulletin Editor
<keeper@lighthouses.org.au>

[Photograph: Marguerite Stephen]


Features

Lighthouses From the Air: Part 3

Bound for South Australia

[David Hurburgh <hurburgh@access1.com.au>]

Lighthouses From the Air: Part 1
Lighthouses From the Air: Part 2

Thursday May 3 ~ Melbourne to Portland

It was a very foggy morning at Moorabbin Airport. It would be 3 hours before conditions were clear enough for take-off. During the wait, Lloyd enjoyed catching up with the Air Traffic Controllers in the Moorabbin Tower. Lloyd used to be a Controller so he likes to keep in touch to see how things are done these days.

During the wait, they also met David Brewster the mayor of the King Island Council, in Bass Strait. He invited Winsome and Lloyd over for the weekend, but with their strict schedule, they had to decline, but promised to call in on David when they do their round-Tassie trip early next year.

The fog eventually cleared around midday. The first lighthouse for the day was the Fawkner Beacon in Port Phillip Bay, and then it was south down the Bay, to its entrance at The Rip, Here they circled the array of lights at Queenscliff and Point Lonsdale.

Their flight-plan next took them westwards.

Winsome thought the Split Point Light at Airey's Inlet looked quite different when seen from the air and from out at sea, compared to the familiar view from ground level.

The magnificent
The magnificent "Shipwreck Coast" from the air.
[Photograph: Winsome Bonham]

Going west along the coast, following the Great Ocean Road, the next lighthouse was at Cape Otway. The coastline between Otway and Warrnambool is known as the Ship Wreck Coast. The scenery, which includes the famous Twelve Apostles, is even more spectacular from the air compared to the viewpoints tourists get to see from their cars.

At Warrnambool, the 2 lighthouses are hard to spot from the air, since they are within the tourist precinct known as the Flagstaff Hill "Old Maritime Village".

Winsome believes the Griffiths Island Light at Port Fairy represents the perfect image of a lighthouse. Its setting on a wave-swept, black basalt point is very picturesque.

Further west at Portland, the light at Whalers Bluff overlooks the Harbour. It's a busy port, so Lloyd had to watch out for the tall loading cranes. At the end of the breakwater, an interesting spiral structure houses a light.

Before landing at Portland for their overnight stop, they circled the Cape Nelson Light and the stretch of rugged coastline it guards. Peter Moss and William Fleming, who are doing a TV documentary on Victorian lighthouses met our aviators at the airport and did an interview.

Friday May 4 ~ Portland to Goolwa

A beautiful sunrise over Portland Harbour was a great start to the day. Crossing the Glenelg River, Lloyd and Winsome were now into South Australia.

The first light to be photographed was Cape Northumberland at Port MacDonnell. With a very prominent red band around the tower, it stands out when seen from the air.

Cape Banks near Carpenter Rocks is also a real landmark, with its all-red tower and a white lantern room.

The next light to the west is Cape Martin at Beachport. Winsome noted a abandoned lighthouse tower on an island. This is the old light on Penguin Island.

The Obelisk at Robe. [Photograph: Winsome Bonham]
The Obelisk at Robe.
[Photograph: Winsome Bonham]

Just along the coast is the picturesque fishing village of Robe. There is the modern light at Robe and out on a nearby headland is the historic red and white striped obelisk which used to house the rockets and other gear for ship-to-shore rescues.

The next "light" was the Cape Jaffa Platform, which is 5 miles offshore on the Margaret Brock Reef. (The fate of this historic structure has been covered in recent Bulletins.) The original light has been relocated to Kingston SE, 10 km to the west where it is now a tourist attraction. From the air, the open framework, red and white tower is difficult to see amongst the built-up parts of the town.

The next stretch of coast consists of the long beaches, dunes and lakes, known as the Coorong. It gave our aviators a peaceful hour of cruising before they reached Goolwa at the mouth of the River Murray. There were parachutists doing jumps in the Goolwa area, so VH-RNL couldn't land immediately. The Cessna had to keep clear of this airspace, until the skydiving was finished.

There are no taxis at Goolwa so Lloyd had to call one over from Victor Harbor 30Km away.

 

The Queenscliff Black Lighthouse. [Photograph: Winsome Bonham] << Click for larger image.
Click to view lighthouse locationThe Queenscliff Black Lighthouse.
[Photograph: Winsome Bonham]

The Queenscliff Black Lighthouse. [Photograph: Winsome Bonham] << Click for larger image.
Click to view lighthouse locationThe Queenscliff White Lighthouse.
[Photograph: Winsome Bonham]

The Point Lonsdale Lighthouse. [Photograph: Winsome Bonham] << Click for larger image.
Click to view lighthouse locationThe Point Lonsdale Lighthouse.
[Photograph: Winsome Bonham]

The Split Point Lighthouse at Aireys Inlet. [Photograph: Winsome Bonham] << Click for larger image.
Click to view lighthouse locationThe Split Point Lighthouse at Aireys Inlet.
[Photograph: Winsome Bonham]

The Cape Otway Lighthouse. [Photograph: Winsome Bonham] << Click for larger image.
Click to view lighthouse locationThe Cape Otway Lighthouse.
[Photograph: Winsome Bonham]

The Lady Bay Lighthouses at Warrnambool. [Photograph: Winsome Bonham] << Click for larger image.
Click to view lighthouse locationThe Lady Bay Lighthouses at Warrnambool.
[Photograph: Winsome Bonham]

The Griffith Island Lighthouses at Port Fairy. [Photograph: Winsome Bonham] << Click for larger image.
Click to view lighthouse locationThe Griffith Island Lighthouses at Port Fairy.
[Photograph: Winsome Bonham]

The Whalers Bluff Lighthouse at Portland. [Photograph: Winsome Bonham] << Click for larger image.
Click to view lighthouse locationThe Whalers Bluff Lighthouse at Portland.
[Photograph: Winsome Bonham]

The Cape Nelson Lighthouse near Portland. [Photograph: Winsome Bonham] << Click for larger image.
Click to view lighthouse locationThe Cape Nelson Lighthouse near Portland.
[Photograph: Winsome Bonham]

Saturday May 5 ~ Goolwa to Kangaroo Island

A clear and bright morning promised good conditions for the flight out to Kangaroo Island (KI). En-route they passed over Page Island, onto Backstairs Passage (aka St Albans) and then it was Cape Willoughby on KI. This light has had a lot of restoration work done on it recently, with full access for visitors.

Most of the named landmarks around this stretch of the southeast coast of Australia can be attributed to the early explorers Flinders and Baudin.

Next, it was out across the Flinders Chase National Park, to the western end of the Island and the very exposed Cape du Couedic light. There was some turbulence here, so Lloyd had to stay higher than 500 feet. Despite that, Winsome got some good shots of the Cape.

The next sector took them north to Cape Borda. The light and adjoining cottages are in a cleared area, cut out of the forest. The north coast of KI is very pretty as you go east towards Point Marsden and into Kingscote, the main town on KI.

Winsome and Lloyd were met at the airport by David Bell of Emu Airways. Their home for the night was at a little B&B called Koala Lodge. A local attraction is a penguin colony coming ashore at dusk.

Sunday May 6 ~ Kangaroo Island to Adelaide

This was an easy day with only 3 lights, Snapper Point, Cape Jervis and Marino Rocks before landing at Parafield, Adelaide's airport for "General Aviation".

Monday May 7 ~ Eudunda

This day gave our fliers a well-earned rest.

Winsome's long time friend Pat had invited our travellers to spend the stopover at her home in Eudunda, 115 km north of Adelaide.

Tuesday May 8 ~ Adelaide to Port Pirie

It was an early start for Lloyd and Winsome since they had to drive back to Parafield airport from Eudunda.

Flying into and around capital cities is a very precise business. All planes have to take an exact route, which can be quite tricky unless you are very familiar with the terrain.

Soon after take-off, the Cessna disappeared off the controller's radar. Lloyd had specified a low-level flight out to the Long Spit light in the middle of the Gulf of St. Vincent. There was a mild panic from the tower until the controllers realized VH- RNL was flying below their radar coverage.

At the low flight level, Lloyd could hear the tower on his radio, but they couldn't hear him. Fortunately, there was another aircraft in the vicinity. This plane could relay messages and his position, while Lloyd was tracking out to the lights on Orontes Bank and Tapley Shoal. Again, it was very assuring to see the air traffic people were on the ball.

The light tower at Troubridge Island is a beautiful structure with its red and white stripes. In the mid-1990s, the tower was threatened by erosion from the sea. However an initiative from the Cadell Training Centre saw 12 volunteers build a 1000 tonne sea-wall which protects the light and the homesteads.

At the southern end of the Yorke Peninsula is the slim, natural red brick light tower at Troubridge Hill. Winsome noted the countryside was starting to look a lot drier.

The next light on the flight-plan was Cape Spencer and then it was out to Althorpe Island. There are two lights on Althorpe; a white hut at one end, and the original lighthouse and keepers cottage in the centre. Nearby is a grass airstrip, which is used for servicing the Island's lights. On the sheltered, mainland side of the island there is a jetty and a flying fox.

Back across to West Cape on the Yorke Peninsula, and then to Corny Point, with its 16 metre high stone tower.

The Cape Northumberland Lighthouse near Port Macdonnell. [Photograph: Winsome Bonham] << Click for larger image.
Click to view lighthouse locationThe Cape Northumberland Lighthouse near Port Macdonnell.
[Photograph: Winsome Bonham]

The Cape Banks Lighthouse near Carpenter Rocks. [Photograph: Winsome Bonham] << Click for larger image.
Click to view lighthouse locationThe Cape Banks Lighthouse near Carpenter Rocks.
[Photograph: Winsome Bonham]

The Pengiun Is land Lighthouse at Beachport. [Photograph: Winsome Bonham] << Click for larger image.
Click to view lighthouse locationThe Pengiun Is land Lighthouse at Beachport.
[Photograph: Winsome Bonham]

The Cape Martin Lighthouse at Beachport. [Photograph: Winsome Bonham] << Click for larger image.
Click to view lighthouse locationThe Cape Martin Lighthouse at Beachport.
[Photograph: Winsome Bonham]

The Robe Lighthouse. [Photograph: Winsome Bonham] << Click for larger image.
Click to view lighthouse locationThe Robe Lighthouse.
[Photograph: Winsome Bonham]

The Margaret Brock Reef Platform near Kingston SE. [Photograph: Winsome Bonham] << Click for larger image.
Click to view lighthouse locationThe Margaret Brock Reef Platform near Kingston SE.
[Photograph: Winsome Bonham]

The Cape Jaffa Lighthouse at Kingston SE. [Photograph: Winsome Bonham] << Click for larger image.
Click to view lighthouse locationThe Cape Jaffa Lighthouse at Kingston SE.
[Photograph: Winsome Bonham]

Tracking north to Port Pirie, they flew over Wardang Island, and its GRP light. This island was the home of the infamous Rabbit Calicivirus. The last light for the day was Warburton Point, which is another GRP. This sits on a red metal framework tower.

Lloyd discussing their adventure with Lin Joyce of the Port Pirie Aero Club. [Photograph: Winsome Bonham]
Lloyd discussing their adventure with Lin Joyce of the Port Pirie Aero Club.
[Photograph: Winsome Bonham]

Lin and Barbara Joyce met our fliers at the Port Pirie Aero Club and kindly offered them a bed for the night. Winsome and Lloyd were given a tour of the town, which included the large Pasminco lead smelter that dominates Port Pirie, both physically and economically.

Wednesday May 9 ~ Port Pirie to Port Lincoln

When taxiing along the runway, Lloyd realised all his navigation points had dropped off his GPS unit. They had to go back to their friends' place and re-enter all that day's waypoints.

Heading across to the Point Lowly lighthouse, they ran into some rain showers. This was to be a foretaste of things to come! The rain and clouds obscured any views of Whyalla.

Tracking down Spencer Gulf, there were 3 GRP lights to photograph. They were Western, Yarraville, and Plank Shoals. Shoalwater Point is a framework tower just off the western shore of the Gulf.

Before getting to Port Lincoln, the next stopover point, there were a few more lights and islands to cover. Dangerous Reef and nearby islands are something special, with their large seal and cormorant colonies.

From Cape Donnington, Winsome could spot the "tuna farms". This is an important industry around the Port Lincoln district,

The last two lights for the day were Point Fanny and Point Boston. With rain showers sweeping in, it was a challenge to get a visual fix on the Port Lincoln Airport.

That afternoon, Winsome and Lloyd did a series of interviews with ABC Radio stations. They included the local station, Radio National and ABC Newcastle.

Thursday May 10 ~ Port Lincoln to Streaky Bay

Rain showers were persisting that morning, as the Cessna headed towards the GRPs on Taylor and Thistle Islands.

Wedge Island is aptly named, and with the tower at its highest end, there was a fair degree of "mechanical turbulence". This is caused by physical obstructions, which generate swirls and downdrafts. Caution dictated that low-level orbits of this light wouldn't be a wise manoeuvre.

The next sector of the flight plan had Lloyd heading towards the Neptune group of islands. On South Neptune there is the 1985 cylindrical brick tower and the much older keepers cottages. There is only a white GRP on North Neptune.

From Four Hummocks it was a peaceful cruise up the west coast of the Eyre Peninsula, towards their next stop, the little fishing and holiday town of Streaky Bay.

The Streaky Bay Airport. Passenger terminal in foreground. [Photograph: Winsome Bonham]
The Streaky Bay Airport. Passenger terminal in foreground.
[Photograph: Winsome Bonham]

The gravel airstrip here was not as flat as first impressions would give. Trevor Gilmore, a representative from the local town council greeted Winsome and Lloyd at the airstrip. The locals' hospitality was fantastic. The visitors were given the use of a car whilst they were in town.

The Cape Jervis Lighthouse near Lands End. [Photograph: Winsome Bonham] << Click for larger image.
Click to view lighthouse locationThe Cape Jervis Lighthouse near Lands End.
[Photograph: Winsome Bonham]

The Cape Willoughby Lighthouse on Kangaroo Island. [Photograph: Winsome Bonham] << Click for larger image.
Click to view lighthouse locationThe Cape Willoughby Lighthouse on Kangaroo Island.
[Photograph: Winsome Bonham]

The Cape St Albans Lighthouse on Kangaroo Island. [Photograph: Winsome Bonham] << Click for larger image.
Click to view lighthouse locationThe Cape St Albans Lighthouse on Kangaroo Island.
[Photograph: Winsome Bonham]

The Cape du Couedic Lighthouse on Kangaroo Island. [Photograph: Winsome Bonham] << Click for larger image.
Click to view lighthouse locationThe Cape du Couedic Lighthouse on Kangaroo Island.
[Photograph: Winsome Bonham]

The Cape Borda Lighthouse on Kangaroo Island. [Photograph: Winsome Bonham] << Click for larger image.
Click to view lighthouse locationThe Cape Borda Lighthouse on Kangaroo Island.
[Photograph: Winsome Bonham]

The Marino Rocks Lighthouse south of Adelaide. [Photograph: Winsome Bonham] << Click for larger image.
Click to view lighthouse locationThe Marino Rocks Lighthouse south of Adelaide.
[Photograph: Winsome Bonham]

The Troubridge Island Lighthouse near Edithburgh. [Photograph: Winsome Bonham] << Click for larger image.
Click to view lighthouse locationThe Troubridge Island Lighthouse near Edithburgh.
[Photograph: Winsome Bonham]

The Troubridge Hill Lighthouse near Edithburgh. [Photograph: Winsome Bonham] << Click for larger image.
Click to view lighthouse locationThe Troubridge Hill Lighthouse near Edithburgh.
[Photograph: Winsome Bonham]

 

Lloyd meets Trevor Gilmore from the Streaky Bay Town Council. [Photograph: Winsome Bonham]
Lloyd meets Trevor Gilmore from the Streaky Bay Town Council.
[Photograph: Winsome Bonham]

Friday May 11 ~ Streaky Bay to Nullarbor

There was a minor hiccup over the refuelling arrangements for the Cessna, but in true bush fashion, it was soon straightened out.

The first light for the day was a white GRP hut on Cape Bauer just outside the town. They were heading west now and tracked out to sea to cover the GRPs on Evans and St Francis Islands.

270 kilometres of continuous cliffs make up the Great Australian Bight. [Photograph: Winsome Bonham]
270 kilometres of continuous cliffs make up the Great Australian Bight.
[Photograph: Winsome Bonham]

From this point on, right across the long stretch of the Great Australian Bight to Esperance in WA there were no lights to photograph, just a magnificent cliff-lined coast.

It was a 270-km peaceful cruise along the far west coast of South Australia. Winsome and Lloyd had planned a stop over for just one night at the Nullarbor Motel at the Head of the Bight. But, the best laid plans!

The Nullabor airfield with water over it. [Photograph: Winsome Bonham]
The Nullabor airfield with water over it.
[Photograph: Winsome Bonham]

That night there was a huge downpour of rain, with 25 mm ( 1 inch) bucketing down in just 23 minutes.

Dirt airstrips and heavy rain are not a good mix! For the first time on the trip, weather was going to cause a serious hold-up. It was going to be a 4-day wait. The local airstrips had to be dry enough to allow safe take-offs and landings before our fliers could get back in the air and resume their adventure.

RNL parked outside the Nullabor Motel after the rain. [Photograph: Winsome Bonham]
RNL parked outside the Nullabor Motel after the rain.
[Photograph: Winsome Bonham]

Next Month - Part 4 of "Lighthouses from the Air"

"Westward Ho! & On to the Top End".

The Althorpe Island Lighthouse. [Photograph: Winsome Bonham] << Click for larger image.
Click to view lighthouse locationThe Althorpe Island Lighthouse.
[Photograph: Winsome Bonham]

The Cape Spencer Lighthouse. [Photograph: Winsome Bonham] << Click for larger image.
Click to view lighthouse locationThe Cape Spencer Lighthouse.
[Photograph: Winsome Bonham]

The West Cape Lighthouse. [Photograph: Winsome Bonham] << Click for larger image.
Click to view lighthouse locationThe West Cape Lighthouse.
[Photograph: Winsome Bonham]

The Corny Point Lighthouse. [Photograph: Winsome Bonham] << Click for larger image.
Click to view lighthouse locationThe Corny Point Lighthouse.
[Photograph: Winsome Bonham]

The Point Lowly Lighthouse. [Photograph: Winsome Bonham] << Click for larger image.
Click to view lighthouse locationThe Point Lowly Lighthouse.
[Photograph: Winsome Bonham]

The Commonwealth Lighthouse on Cape Donnington. [Photograph: Winsome Bonham] << Click for larger image.
Click to view lighthouse locationThe Commonwealth Lighthouse on Cape Donnington.
[Photograph: Winsome Bonham]

The South Neptune Island Lighthouse. [Photograph: Winsome Bonham] << Click for larger image.
Click to view lighthouse locationThe South Neptune Island Lighthouse.
[Photograph: Winsome Bonham]

Preview of New Lighthouse Book

[Denise Shultz <pshultz@tpgi.com.au>]

A mock up of the cover before going to press. [Image: John Ibbotson]
A mock up of the cover before going to press.
[Image: John Ibbotson]

Any person devoted to Australian lighthouses is probably as frustrated as I am with the lack of books about our favourite subject on the shop shelves as well as in the libraries. True, we have Stuart Buchanan's two wonderful books "The Lighthouse Keepers" and "The Lighthouse of Tragedy" and Donald Walker's "Beacons of Hope" about Cape Otway and Cape Wickham lighthouses but there was not a book dealing with the whole subject of Australian lighthouses since 1988 's "From Dusk till Dawn". For those people who missed out on this gem of a book like me, do not despair. The waiting is over. Thirteen years after "From Dusk Till Dawn" we will be rewarded with a real treat. Its name is "Lighthouses of Australia - Images from the End of an Era" and its author - none other than our member John Ibbotson.

The books author, John Ibbotson. [Photograph: John Ibbotson]
The books author, John Ibbotson.
[Photograph: John Ibbotson]

John loves photography and was first drawn to it back in late sixties when, after graduating from Melbourne's RMIT as a metallurgist, he moved to New York and later to Alaska.

The Alaskan wilderness in combination with its unique soft polar light had taken such a grip of him, that he followed bears, floated wild rivers and climbed mountains to take photographs. The results, along with his stories, appeared in Alaska Magazine, Alaska Geographic, Alaska Outdoors, Adventure Travel and National Geographic books.

When John moved back to Melbourne in 1992 he just continued to take photographs of Australia until he decided to take on the task of photographing all of the Australian lighthouses.

It took him seven years to collect the photographs and the information he needed. On his trips John closely collaborated with AMSA and had to be ready every time they called him to join a crew on a maintenance trip to a remote lighthouse.

John Ibbotson and his trusty 1976 Valiant. [Photograph: John Ibbotson]
John Ibbotson and his trusty 1976 Valiant.
[Photograph: John Ibbotson]

To complete his collection of photographs John, and his American friend Jack Bruil, drove from Brisbane to Perth. (See the LoA Bulletins from November 2000 to January 2001).

They drove 20,000 km in John's 1976 Valiant and photographed lighthouses from Cape York and Thursday Island to Cape Leveque in Western Australia.

When he could not get to the lighthouse by car or on foot he hired other kinds of transport to get there, starting from light plane and helicopter to fishing boat. To take on such a huge task required great organizational effort and ability to overcome bureaucratic obstacles.

The photograph of Low Head from John's book. [Photograph: John Ibbotson]
The photograph of Low Head from John's book.
[Photograph: John Ibbotson]

All this hard work bore fruit in the form of this 288 page, 305 x 267 mm so called coffee table book, containing 500 photographs of over 220 Australian lighthouses.

To be quite fair this is not only a coffee table book full of beautiful photographs to admire. It will also be a very good reference book for lighthouse enthusiasts as well as a casual reader who wants to learn something about Australian maritime history.

The book is divided into nine parts.

Part one, The History of Lighthouses, describes separately how the towers and the lights developed over the millennia starting from Colossus of Rhodes to the lightships of twentieth century and from wood fires to today's halogen bulbs. As a person with an experience in glass manufacturing I really appreciated the part devoted to the glass as a material used in lens production. (You would be surprised how many people do not know that "crystal" is a type of glass.) This part also deals with modern navigational devices like GPS and Differential GPS.

The photograph of Eddystone Point from John's book. [Photograph: John Ibbotson]
The photograph of Eddystone Point from John's book.
[Photograph: John Ibbotson]

Part two is devoted solely to the History of Australia's Lighthouses starting with colonial lights, state lights up to 1915 Commonwealth Lighthouse service until 1990s and the lighthouse automation and demanning. The history is complete and up to date until 2000.

There are separate parts dealing with lightships, ownership changes and DGPS installation which tolled the final bell for the traditional tower based lighthouses.

Parts two to seven are the main part of the book. They contain colour photographs of Australian lighthouses, which are separated according to their state in this order.

Part two: New South Wales
Part three: Victoria
Part four: Tasmania
Part five: South Australia
Part six: Western Australia and Northern Territory
Part seven: Queensland

These chapters do not contain only stunning photographs. Also included are an index and one or more maps according to the size of the state area. There is information about each lighthouse photographed, which includes its date of building, height of the tower, its elevation and range. All parameters are thankfully in meters or kilometers and for those who can not cope with metric units there is a conversion formula at the end of the book. A brief history of the given lighthouse is also provided in most cases. The maps provide the reader with the geographical position of each of the photographed lights.

One of the state maps showing the location of the lighthouses. [Image: John Ibbotson]
One of the state maps showing the location of the lighthouses.
[Image: John Ibbotson]

Part eight would be appreciated by people who, like John, want to visit as many Lighthouses and Maritime Museums as they can. This is the state by state list and available information about all the maritime museums and lightstations in Australia which are open to public. The location or the address is always provided so all one needs is a map and a bit of planning to see them all and be able to know what to expect.

Part nine which is the last part of the book contains several very useful Appendices as well as the Bibliography and Index. The first one is unique, as I did not see it in any other book so far. It contains chronological list of all the lighthouses ever built in Australia whether they are still standing or not. From this list we can glean not only the well known fact that the first Australian lighthouse was Macquarie built in Sydney in 1818 and replaced in 1883 by the one that still stands today but also that the new lights are still being built, the last one of them on Maxwell Reef near Cooktown in December 2000.

The photograph of Cape Jaffa from John's book. [Photograph: John Ibbotson]
The photograph of Cape Jaffa from John's book.
[Photograph: John Ibbotson]

Another useful appendix is the glossary explaining the technical terms used in the text, explanations and the formulae used in converting nautical and imperial units into metric.

Even though John's forté is definitely photography this, (and I do not like calling it that way) "coffee table" book will be appreciated for its informative text as well as for the images that take your breath away. It has been well researched and contains some priceless and up to date information. It should be part of every lighthouse aficionado's library and like "From Dusk Till Dawn" before, it will be appreciated for years to come.

"Lighthouses of Australia - Images from the End of an Era" will be published in the end of November and can be obtained by printing, filling in and posting of the following order.

Word Format Order
PDF Format Order
HTML Format Order


Letters & Notices

Your Beautiful Newsletter Is Greatly Enjoyed

Hi Malcolm

I look forward to continued monthly bulletins. Each month your beautiful newsletter is greatly enjoyed.

Will probably never get to Australia but can sure enjoy from afar. Have been a lighthouse enthusiast for many years and and a charter member of most American groups.

I spend my summers as a narrator for the Friends of the Boston Harbor Islands. We do monthly trips to Boston Light (1716) also trips along the Massachusett coast to tell the story of our lights.

Keep up the great work.

Yours Faithfully

Raymond Empey <skipe@ultranet.com>

Letters re Johnson Family Watsons Bay

Dear Malcolm

The Hornby LighthouseSince I last emailed you about the Johnson family and the Hornby Light I have unearthed new information about the family and its association with the lighthouse. There are some name varations as we have now verified some of the research.

Firstly, HENRY JOHN JOHNSON was definitely the lighthousekeeper of the Hornby Light sometime after his daughter Emily was born in 1859. The family moved to the lighthouse after her birth. Henry's son ALFRED JOHNSON was also the lighthouse keeper here and at the Macquarie Lighthouse.

The 2nd Macquarie LighthouseThe family had a close connection with JAMES JOHNSON, survivor of the Dunbar wreck - either close friends or Henry Johnson's brother. Henry Johnson was a sailmaker from the Channel Islands, born c 1827.

He was married to Mary KENNY, not Mary Jones as previously thought. Mary KENNY was born in Kilkenny, Ireland, [c1836] and was orphaned along with her brother during the potato famine.

Her parents were Patrick and Mary KENNY, her father being a school teacher. Mary KENNY came to Australia in 1849 on the orphan ship "Lismoyne" - according to family anecdore she was the only person on the ship who could read and write.

We know that after Henry died, she had to leave the lighthouse accomodation and moved to Dove House in Watsons Bay.

Her daughter Maryann Johnson married to Robert Lambert lived at 17 Cliff Street, Watsons Bay. Emily Goodwin, her daughter lived in the house behind.

We have been told that the family are documented in "Romance of Australian Lighthouses" by Valmai Phillips. We are still searching for more information and photographs of this family and would like to make contact with any descendants. Can anyone do a lookup for us in Valmai Phillips book?

Also, Mary KENNY is mentioned in "Barefoot and Pregnant" - another book we are trying to find a copy of. Any help would be appreciated. Could you possibly correct info that was incorrect in the first email?

Many Thanks

Annie Lotocki nee Warner <lotocki@ozemail.com.au>

Looking for Captain Thomas Musgrave, Master Mariner, F.R.G.S.

Hi Malcolm

The Wilsons Promontory LightstationI am doing my husband's family tree, and his great grandfather was a Lighthouse Keeper. Do you have a list of the old Lighthouse Keepers? If you do, would it be possible for you to do a look up for me?

His name was Captain Thomas Musgrave, Master Mariner, F.R.G.S.

The Gabo Island LightstationHe was on the "Grafton" when it went down off the Auckland Isles in 1863, and he and his men were stranded there for 20 months. On his return to Sydney he promised his wife that he would never go to sea again.

I have tried unsuccessfully to find records of his whereabouts.

He took up the following Lighthouses in Victoria:

Lakes Entrance Harbour Master  
Wilsons Promotory c1865
Gabo Island c1883
Cape Schanck (photograph on wall at Lighthouse) 1884 - 1887
Cape Otway 1887
Point Lonsdale (died there) ?1888 - 1891

The Cape Otway LightstationI don't think that he could have possibly been anywhere else, although he did live at Williamstown as some of their babies were born there, and others died there, between 1869 - 1876

If you don't could you please tell me where I could find something about Lighthouse Keepers.

Hoping that you can help me.

Kindest regards

Jocelyn Nice <jonice@iprimus.com.au>

Looking for the McCuspie family near Portland

Dear Sir,

I wonder do you have information regarding the McCuspie family who spent some time at or near Portland on lighthouses up until perhaps early 1900s?

Thankyou.

Cathie Fabian (nee McCuspie) <fabes@centralonline.com.au>

Feel free to post any request, letters, notices here regarding research, events etc for any Australian Lighthouse on this notice board.

<keeper@lighthouses.org.au>


Department of Scrounge:

If anybody has any of this material on any Australian lighthouses including the ones listed at the Department of Scrounge it would appreciated, especially the high priority ones:

  • Original Colour Photographs
  • Historical Photographs or Postcards
  • History, experiences and anecdotes
  • Technical History

Please eMail <Keeper>


New Pages & Links

New Pages for Australia:

No new pages for Australia this month

New Links for Australia:

No new links for Australia this month

Also, New Links for World:

No new links for World this month

If your e-mail does not display in HTML these pages can be accessed from the "New Listing for Month Index" at <http://www.lighthouses.org.au/lights/New/Index%20New.htm>


Australian News:

Montague 120th Celebrations

[Mark Westwood <mark@rizingtide.com>].

"May it shine forever" was the theme for the 120th Anniversary of the Commissioning of the Light on Montague Island on Thursday 1st November 2001.

Montague Island Tours, which operates out of Narooma NSW, organised an informal open-day type celebration, with Narooma Charters and the National Parks and Wildlife (NPWS) guides taking three boat-loads of keen visitors out for the morning on the Island.

On the way, the crowd was treated to spectacular close-ups of the Island's famous fur-seal colonies, and enjoyed all the thrill of an open-sea journey in fast boats.

Landing on the Island, the NPWS guides escorted everyone up the hill to the light and the restored quarters "Museum in the Making", including a quick trip, for all those capable, up the tower and out onto the balcony for the real view from the top of the lighthouse.

Guests, June and Suzzane Cameron, taking in the aspect of the light against the nearby coastline. [Photograph: Mark Westwood]
Guests, June and Suzzane Cameron, taking in the aspect of the light against the nearby coastline.
[Photograph: Mark Westwood]

The southerly wind abated for the ceremony on the lawns outside the old quarters, beginning with a special welcome from local Aboriginal Elder Merv Penrith.

"The boat trip was a bit grippy today, but it was better than a bark canoe!" he said, refering to the fact that his ancestors had paddled out in bark canoes to the island for thousands of years. "We still come out here for ceremonies. It's an important place for us all the time, but I'm pleased to be here today for the 120 years get together."

The Signal Station flags 1, 2, 0, celebrate the 120th Anniversary. [Photograph: Laurelle Pacey]
The Signal Station flags 1, 2, 0, celebrate the 120th Anniversary.
[Photograph: Laurelle Pacey]

Guest of Honour was Mr Ian Cameron, retired in 1983 from his position as Supervisor of Maritime Aids (NSW) with the then Department of Shipping and Transport. He was invited both for his work in charge of maintenance for all lights in NSW, and for his personal involvement with Montague. He and his wife June, and daughter Suzanne were the centre of attention for much of the day.

Talking of his memories of Montague Mr Cameron said:

"I was born in Narooma in 1922 when my father, Jock, was a keeper at Montague. We stayed there for a few years before moving away to another light, but eventually came back in the 1930's when Dad was promoted to Head Keeper of Montague."

"A few years into our stay here and unfortunately Dad's old war wounds played up He was taken ashore and to Moruya Hospital but he died after being 'rushed'to Sydney. I say 'rushed'because the roads were in very poor condition, and it was a very slow journey."

"For our family this was the beginning of a very hard time… it was the Depression, and my younger brothers and sister ended up in orphanages until the family got back on its feet and we could be reunited."

Ian reminded us that the keepers were a special group of people across the state:

"A tight community of people sharing the common bond of caring for the lights around the coast.

It's wonderful to see the NPWS restoration work out here, and to get the special feeling you can only get on Montague. NPWS are doing a great job in caring for this place."

Guest of honour, Ian Cameron, cutting the celbration cake. [Photograph: Mark Westwood]
Guest of honour, Ian Cameron, cutting the celbration cake.
[Photograph: Mark Westwood]

Ian cut the amazing 120th cake specially iced by NPWS Guide Colin Sagar, and the whole assembly sang "Happy Birthday" with appropriate gusto, before the final stage of the ceremony - the spectacular unfurling of the old signal flags for 1,2,0 up the halyard on the lighthouse. The flags from the old Narooma Pilot Station were very fragile and dated back to the early 1900's. Unfortunately the Montague set, of larger size, has disappeared somewhere in the many years since they went out of use.

The crowd then enjoyed a sausage sizzle courtesy of NPWS before heading for a walk to the small, lonely cemetery on the Island (the graves of two children and one adult from the late 1800's) and the 9km journey home. Some boats were lucky and encountered some migrating humpback whales on the way.

Ian's insights into the workings of the light and lighthouses in general, as well as his gentle approachable manner meant that many people took the chance during the morning to chat with him about shared experiences and memories of the island. There were also many others present who had connections with the light, including several descendents of keepers, and a few of the ex-keepers and their wives.

Channel 9 filmed the proceedings, both for the local news that night and an upcoming "Saturday Today Show" to be shown on 1st December, marking the 100th anniversary of Cape Byron Light.

Bruce Conley, Head Keeper at Montague. [Photograph: Mark Westwood]
Bruce Conley, Head Keeper at Montague.
[Photograph: Mark Westwood]

At 3pm a small but attentive group gathered ashore at the Narooma Lighthouse Museum for a chat with Laurelle Pacey, author of the soon-to-be-revised "Lure of Montague" book. They also enjoyed the company of Bruce Conley, Head Keeper at Montague for some six years in the seventies. This meeting in front of the original beautiful diatropic lens from Montague now resident in the museum added to the day's sense of occasion.

Enthusiasts gathered at the Narooma Musuem where the original crystal lens is displayed. [Photograph: Mark Westwood]
Enthusiasts gathered at the Narooma Musuem where the original crystal lens is displayed.
[Photograph: Mark Westwood]

Later that night a dedicated, sunburnt and windblown group gathered for a dinner at the Harpoon Restaurant at the Whale Motel in Narooma for a night of quiet reflection on the day's events and more stories of the old times.

Many people purchased the special "120th Anniversary" drinking glasses to keep as mementos of the day. NPWS Narooma has glasses for sale should anyone be interested. Phone them on 02 4476 2888 for information on how to purchase them.

All involved are now looking forward to the 125th anniversary in November 2006.

Cape Willoughby 150th

On 10 January 2002 Cape Willoughby Lighthouse turns 150 years old. Cape Willoughby is the oldest lighthouse in South Australia and as a result it is worth marking this event.

Celebrations to mark the Mathew Flinders and Nicholas Baudin voyages are occurring across South Australia in 2002 (Encounter2002). Kangaroo Island will be featured in March and April 2002. It is therefore appropriate to link the lighthouse celebrations with this major South Australian event.

Cape Willoughby Lightstation today.
[Photograph Courtesy: NPWS SA]
Cape Willoughby Lightstation today.
[Photograph Courtesy: NPWS SA]

For the week 1 to 7 April 2002 Cape Willoughby Lightstation will modify its normal tour structure to include reflections of the Flinders and Baudin voyages as well as the early times at Cape Willoughby.

It is anticipated that a pictorial display will be developed of Cape Willoughby and placed on site for this period. National Parks and Wildlife SA is therefore asking anybody who has a photograph, picture or drawing that relates to Cape Willoughby to loan it to NP&WSA for copying and returning to the original owner. All donors will be acknowledged.

The early Cape Willoughby Lightstation Cottages (c1860). [Photograph Courtesy: NPWS SA]
The early Cape Willoughby Lightstation Cottages (c1860).
[Photograph Courtesy: NPWS SA]

These pictures and photographs will be copied and used in this display and also kept in an album for visitors to look at while visiting Cape Willoughby. The pictures will also be kept electronically on a Compact Disc for future use and to prevent damage.

Further details on the celebrations will appear as the time gets closer.

Please contact Daniel Rowley on 08 8553 8233 or 0417 822 343 or email Rowley.Daniel@saugov.sa.gov.au for further information or to offer pictures to be copied.

Deal Island Voyage

[Christian Bell <mccntas@ozemail.com.au>]

Coastal Clean Up, Australian Bush Heritage Fund, the Tasmanian Parks and Wildlife Service (TPWS) and the Marine & Coastal Community Network (MCCN)/Tasmanian Conservation Trust (TCT) are collectively organizing the vessel Sir Hubert Wilkins to take a group of volunteers to Deal Island.

Deal Island from the air with lighthouse on far peak. [Photograph: AMSA]
Deal Island from the air with lighthouse on far peak.
[Photograph: AMSA]

The projects being undertaken on Deal are:

  • A major clean up from the site of all rubbish and materials that are unlikely to be needed
  • The removal of discarded material and refuse at the Lightstation.
  • The carrying out of stabilization works on several recent erosion gullies in relation to the Light track, Garden Cove track and East Cove track.
  • The "fencing off" of the Sea Spurge infestation at East Cove to promote soil stabilisation and native plant recovery (in order to remove the grazing pressure).
  • Mapping and modifying the water system around the houses in the Light Station compound.
  • Effecting the changeover of the next volunteer caretaker group and undertake minor equipment maintenance.
  • Complete the repairs to the bottom floor of the Superintendents Residence.

The Old Head Superintendents Cottage. [Sketch Courtesy: Christian Bell]
The Old Head Superintendents Cottage.
[Sketch Courtesy: Christian Bell]

On nearby Erith Island the Australian Bush Heritage Fund (ABHF):

  • Will replace the roof of the important heritage hut on the Island
  • Remove rusted out rain water tanks
  • Undertake weed control work and with zoologist/ herpertologist/ invertebrate ecologist
  • Undertake a number of surveys while at Erith.

It is also planned to do marine debris survey while at the Kent Group.

As you can imagine space onboard the vessel is at a premium and it is worth noting that each of the participating organizations have filled or almost filled with staff or volunteers almost all positions available for the voyage. However there may just be just one or two positions or roles left to fill on the voyage for subscribers to the Lighthouses of Australia web site if you feel you have some skills that are very pertinent in relation to the field trip.

Email mccntas@ozemail.com.au with your details.

The vessel will leave Hobart at 9am, Saturday, November 24th (for a ten-day round trip), returning on Monday, December 3rd, 2001. We expect to have at least seven days in the Kent Group.

Christian Bell
Marine & Coastal Community Network

The Sir Hubert Wilkins

The ice breaker
The ice breaker "Sir Hubert Wilkins".
[Photograph: Ocean Frontiers]

Australian Antarctic adventurers Don and Margie McIntyre, who head Ocean Frontiers, have purchased the ice-class ship (the 37 metre ice-ship) "Sir Hubert Wilkins" for a program of exploration, discovery and adventure in Australasian and Antarctic waters.

The Finnish-built Sir Hubert Wilkins will open up new opportunities for activities such as educational programs, scientific research, filming, environmental monitoring and private adventures such as exploration and mountaineering.

"Huey" is also available on charter for any activity including remote logistics support in any ocean. The project has already received sponsorship support from Dick Smith Foods.

It provides the opportunity for Australian businesses to become involved as sponsors, allowing them to be identified with projects as diverse as mapping uncharted Antarctic waters, conducting scientific and environmental research, removing rubbish from Antarctica and providing educational material to school students.

The ship will provide a "community" service in support of certain activities.

Other voyages will be conducted on a cost recovery basis, whilst some voyages will run at a profit in order to ensure that the overall program for the vessel covers its operating costs and services its capital.

The venture will depend heavily on an enthusiastic crew of highly professional volunteers who are committed to the project's aims.

Eddystone Point Clean Up

[Christian Bell <mccntas@ozemail.com.au>]

The Tasmanian Parks & Wildlife organized a working bee for volunteers wishing to assist with maintenance of the Eddystone Point Light Station within Mt William National Park, to prepare the Lighthouse cottages and grounds for the WILDCARE Volunteer Caretakers Program. The working bee occurred on Saturday & Sunday, 22-23 September this year. Over twenty volunteers participated.

The Eddystone Lighthouse and historic grave. [Photograph: Ed Kavaliunas]
The Eddystone Lighthouse and historic grave.
[Photograph: Ed Kavaliunas]

The works undertaken over the weekend included -

  • General building maintenance including cleaning, preparing for painting.
  • Weeding and ground maintenance and gardening and tree lopping.
  • Removal of general rubbish from the site.
  • Fixing fences.

It is anticipated that there is a need to commence a volunteer caretaker scheme (at least for an interim measure) as the resolution of the long-term arrangements for management of the site may take some time to resolve (see September 2001 Bulletin). There have been periods throughout the last few years where there was no person present on site leaving the Light Station vulnerable to vandalism (fortunately none occurred).

An Eddystone Point keeper's cottage. [Photograph: AMSA]
An Eddystone Point keeper's cottage.
[Photograph: AMSA]

At present there is a ranger occupying the head keeper's house. The caretaker scheme is likely to commence when the asbestos roofs of the Assistant Keepers cottages are removed and replaced with an alternative roofing material, perhaps sometime before the end of the year.

For the present however Light Station is looking in much better shape than it has for the past five years full credit to the volunteers that participated in the clean up and the rangers who organized the event.

If you know of any news or event effecting an Australian Lighthouse please forward it to us so we can publish in the Monthly Bulletin.


Join Lighthouses of Australia Inc.

It is up to those of you who believe in the Preservation, Protection and Promotion of Australia's lighthouse heritage to throw your hat into the ring, whether it just be a financial member or direct involvement on the committee, web pages, the Bulletin or some other aspect that could enrich the site.

Or printer-friendly versions Membership Forms with card payment authorities that can be mailed:

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While we are in the process of setting up secure payments, we request that you open one of the Printer Friendly Versions above, print the form, fill in your details and post with payment.

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Thankyou


Thanks to the Following People for Their Help in October:

Ken Baker (Info)
Josh Waddell (Photographs)
Jacob Bax (Photographs)
Lew Dickson (Photographs)
Hilary Warnett (Page Registrations)

Thanks to all the people who have put links to the site

Thanks to those who let me use their photos for thumbnails.


Regards until the December 2001 Bulletin
Malcolm Macdonald

http://www.lighthouses.org.au/lights/


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