Lighthouses of Australia Project - APRIL 00 BULLETIN

VOL 5 No 4
APRIL 2002
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Dear Friends

Features

Lighthouses of the Air - Tasmania
2002 LoA Inc Annual Dinner
USLS Australian Tour Farewell Dinner
Johnsons on Maatsuyker
Radio Interview

Letters & Notices

Department of Scrounge

New Pages & Links

New Pages for Australia
New Links for Australia
New Links for World

Australian News

Wollongong Breakwater Lighthouse Relit
Point Lonsdale Celebrates 100th Anniversary
Bustard Head Lighthouse Association Takes Possession
Cape Leeuwin and Cape Naturaliste to be Leased

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Dear Friends

One Man Bands Have a Limited Life

Part of a result of my illness over the last 2 years is that I have narrowed my own involvement down to mainly keeping the Bulletin going as I think this is the life blood of our organisation. Even then this takes up at least 40 hours a month!

One of our long term supporters hit the nail on the head recently when he said he should stop unloading things directly on me. Many of you are still doing it and I am yet to convince you that you have to organise yourselves to move LoA Inc forward.

I have no problem with things coming straight to me and I don't mind being involved. What is stressful and really tires me is when there is an expectation that "I" am going to do something about it alone.

In reality I have no more skills, ability or time than most of you. I remember when I didn't know how to to do most of the things I now do for granted. I am amazed how often I still make new discoveries.

On the other hand many of you have expectations of what you have to do that are far too high. In reality some jobs are very simple and come together to make a larger component.

Many hands make light work. There is a regular group that does small jobs and this makes the load easier. Some of these jobs are very simple but save hours on things like the Bulletin.

The amount of emails I get saying "but what can I do?" Well you can do an amazing amount right in your own area. Here are a few examples:

  • Keeping an eye out for local lighthouse news and issues for the Bulletin
  • Promoting LoA Inc in your area and signing up new members
  • Finding out who has the history, anecdotes and old photos of your local lighthouse
  • Organising activities such as:
    • Managing the registration of pages with search engines
    • The annual dinner when it comes to your State (Perth, WA, 2003)
    • Gathering together members in your area for your own functions and activities
    • Fund raising
    • Forming "Home Lighthouse Groups" to adopt a lighthouse and watch out for it's welfare.
  • Finding links to match keyword in Bulletin stories
  • The registration of pages with search engines
  • Finding new links to replace broken links
  • Being a financial member

I suppose the thing is to step back and look not at what you can't do but examine your existing skills and see if they can be used in some way no matter how small to move LoA Inc towards its objectives.

Time is Coming for LoA Inc to Take a Stand

The Cape Jaffa platformParting of being involved in a group that works for the preservation, protection and promotion of lighthouse heritage is that inevitably one day we will have to take a stand on an issue that may end up being unpleasant.

A recent example of this was the campaign to stop AMSA from demolishing the Cape Jaffa platform.

There are rumblings that one of major lightstations that has been leased is rapidly deteriorating because when the lease was made up there was no formal agreement for the responsibility of maintaining the physical infrastructure of the heritage buildings.

While I can not give specific details at the moment we are monitoring the situation and hope to bring details to you, hopefully including a resolution, in an upcoming Bulletin.

It is easy to enjoy romantic trip stories and historical features and other functions but the purpose of our group is to also make the hard decisions and take a stand when necessary.

This Month's Features

Lighthouses of the Air - TasmaniaThe great epoch journey comes to an end with Lloyd and Winsomes' Lighthouses of the Air - Tasmania. This leg completes their circumnavigation of Australia, photographing all our lights.

2002 LoA Inc Annual DinnerThe re-lighting of the Wollongong Breakwater Lighthouse made a great backdrop for the 2002 LoA Inc Annual Dinner and added to the night's success.

USLS Australian Tour Farewell DinnerSeveral days later saw us at the US Lighthouse Society Australian tour farewell dinner in St Kilda where we met old friends and made many new ones.

Johnsons on Maatsuyker Radio InterviewThe Johnsons on Maatsuyker radio interview is a brief grab of an audio interview with the current caretakers of the lightstation on this, the most remote lightstation in Australia.

Wollongong Breakwater Lighthouse RelitThis Month's News

After 28 years the and a full restoration Wollongong Breakwater Lighthouse relit in conjunction with the LoA Inc 2002 Annual Dinner.

Point Lonsdale Celebrates 100th AnniversaryLast month Point Lonsdale celebrated its 100th anniversary of the current tower with a commemoration and rededication service.

Bustard Head Lighthouse Association Takes PossessionAfter 10 long years of lobbying the Bustard Head Lighthouse Association takes possession of the lightstation. Now the long job of restoration and preparation begins.

Cape Leeuwin and Cape Naturaliste to be LeasedThe Western Australian Government has decided that Cape Leeuwin and Cape Naturaliste are to be leased. We wait with baited breath for the outcome.

Malcolm Macdonald is the founder and convener of Lighthouses of Australia

Malcolm Macdonald
Bulletin Editor
<keeper@lighthouses.org.au>

[Photograph: Marguerite Stephen]


Features

Lighthouses of the Air - Tasmania

[David Hurburgh <hurburgh@access1.com.au>]

Months of planning went into Winsome and Lloyd's latest expedition "Lighthouses from the Air - Tasmania".

They had learned a lot from having circumnavigated the continent of Australia by Cessna in mid-2001. Logistics were going to be a lot simpler; the size of Tasmania saw to that.

Lloyd and Winsome had picked up quite a few "tricks" from the earlier expedition. Lloyd was now an old hand at doing the tight maneuvers in VH-RNL when doing the orbits around the lighthouses, and Winsome was now an expert "aerial photographer" having shot thousands of frames during the circumnavigation of "The Big Island".

Monday 31 December 2001 ~ Maitland to Yarram

Unfortunately the flight south to Tasmania from their home base of Maitland (NSW) was not going to be fuss-free.

In that last week of December 2001 huge bushfires were raging from north of Sydney down to the South Coast of NSW, almost to the Victorian border. Extremely poor visibility, due to thick smoke, made flying in light aircraft impossible.

The interruption to the front end of the trip meant postponing another lighthouse-photographing run down the South Coast. Instead it involved a long flight, making a wide sweep westwards and inland to avoid the bushfires and the heavy smoke.

Tuesday 1 January 2002 ~ Yarram to Flinders Island

After the delay, they made it safely down to Bass Strait on New Year's Day 2002. Their first overnight stop was Flinders Island.

On their arrival it was wet and windy, but our travellers didn't mind, after all the hassles up north.

Conditions around the Deal Island light were too turbulent to get in close, but Winsome got some good shots of Swan Island and Goose Island.

These convict built lights are the oldest (circa 1843) in Bass Strait. The two lights are very similar, with Goose being the taller by 3 metres.

Lighthouses From the Air: Part 1
Lighthouses From the Air: Part 2
Lighthouses From the Air: Part 3
Lighthouses From the Air: Part 4
Lighthouses From the Air: Part 5
Lighthouses From the Air: Part 6
Lighthouses From the Air: Part 7


The Deal Island Lighthouse in Bass Strait. [Photograph: Winsome Bonham] << Click for larger image.
Click to view lighthouse locationThe Deal Island Lighthouse in Bass Strait.
[Photograph: Winsome Bonham]

The Swan Island Lighthouse in Bass Strait. [Photograph: Winsome Bonham] << Click for larger image.
Click to view lighthouse locationThe Swan Island Lighthouse in Bass Strait.
[Photograph: Winsome Bonham]

The Goose Island Lighthouse in Bass Strait. [Photograph: Winsome Bonham] << Click for larger image.
Click to view lighthouse locationThe Goose Island Lighthouse in Bass Strait.
[Photograph: Winsome Bonham]

Wednesday 2 January ~ Flinders Island (rest day)

Winsome and Lloyd were impressed by the familiarity of the Flinders Island locals with aviation. The Islanders have a high dependence on planes, which provide much of their essential services and transport.

Lloyd struck up a great conversation with Leedham Walker, the owner of the main store in Whitemark (Flinders' principle town). The Walker's are also the local Avgas agent, so all aspects of flying are familiar to them. Winsome recalls how friendly and helpful these island people were.

Lloyd strikes up a great discussion about their trip with Leedham and Judy Walker. [Image: Winsome Bonham]
Lloyd strikes up a great discussion about their trip with Leedham and Judy Walker.
[Image: Winsome Bonham]

Thursday 3 January ~ Flinders Island to Wynyard

The next sector took the Cessna towards the Tasmanian "mainland". Landfall was at the Low Head Light. Its distinctive broad red band around its middle, struck Winsome as being particularly attractive. Low Head marks the mouth of the Tamar River.

They also picked up the three "leading lights" which mark the tricky navigation channels near the mouth of the river.

Heading west towards Devonport, Mersey Bluff is another boldly marked light, with a vertical red stripe on the seaward side, and then painted white on the inland side.

The Don Valley tourist steam railway engine was out on an excursion as the Cessna flew along the coastline at 500 feet. Maintaining this altitude gave our fliers enviable views of the rocky North West Coast

Table Cape near Wynyard, is a beautiful location. In springtime the surrounding paddocks are full of tulip blooms. The last two lights for the day were Round Hill Point and Rocky Cape.

Friday 4 January ~ Wynyard to Cambridge ( Hobart)

Today, the flight plan took them back east. Eddystone Point, which marks the easternmost extremity of Tasmania is a formidable structure built out of locally quarried granite.

It is fitting that this light should be named after the famous Eddystone light in England. The bright orange and red lichens that seem to cover much of the rocky coastal landforms around Tasmania impressed Winsome.

Most of the new generation GRP huts around the Tasmanian coast are hard to see from the air. Since they lack the aesthetics of classic lighthouses this is hardly a bad thing.

Half way down the East Coast is the Freycinet Peninsula where the Cape Tourville and Point Home Lookout lighthouses were built in the early 1970s.

Although the lights are substantial concrete structures, the adjoining utility rooms have been clad with local granite, which helps them blend into the landscape. A new boardwalk at Cape Tourville gives sublime views along the rugged coastline.

This year 2002 marks the bicentenary of the detailed exploration and mapping of the Tasmanian East Coast by the French navigator Nicholas Baudin. This explains the many French place names (such as Tourville, Freycinet, Bruni D'entrecasteaux) around the Tassie coastline

The Freycinet National Park is a very popular destination for both bushwalkers and those visiting the local resorts.

The pink granite mountains in the park are known as the Hazards, named after a Captain Hazard who was shipwrecked there.

They form a picturesque backdrop behind the township of Coles Bay. The blue waters and white sands of nearby Wineglass Bay have made this area a prime attraction for visitors.

Heading up the Derwent River towards Hobart, Winsome was impressed by the elegant sweep of the Tasman Bridge, which links the city to its Eastern Shore.

Saturday 5 January ~ Cambridge to Cambridge

At the entrance to the Derwent Estuary, she photographed the famous Iron Pot Lighthouse and the distinctive red beacon with the formal name John Garrow Shoal.

To the local "yachties" this blood red beacon off Sandy Bay's Long Point is known as Blinking (even Stinking) Billy. A nearby effluent pipe outlet might have something to do with its nickname.

The Ferry that runs from Kettering to Bruny Island. [Image: Winsome Bonham]
The Ferry that runs from Kettering to Bruny Island.
[Image: Winsome Bonham]

Along the Dentrecasteaux Channel, which separates the 70 km long Bruny Island from the mainland, there are numerous GRP huts. On the southern tip of Bruny Island is Cape Bruny.

A GRP hut has replaced the beautiful historic light, however the original infrastructure is being kept in good shape, thanks to its role as a prime tourist destination.

From Bruny, it was a short sector tracking north east across Storm Bay to the southeast tip of the Tasman Peninsula.

Tasman Island has to be the most spectacular setting for a lighthouse in Australian waters. The 300 metre high vertical cliffs rise straight from the sea.

A 3-D model of this terrain is viewable through this link at the Parks and Wildlife website.

The organ-pipes of columnar dolerite around Tasman Peninsula are a true sentinel to all mariners in the area. They make you appreciate the skills and qualities needed to build and maintain a lighthouse in such a location. The recently expanded Tasman National Park preserves much of this coastline.

The nearby Port Arthur convict-era ruins are grimly emblematic but at the same time, make a strangely beautiful sight. It forms an essential Tasmanian icon of a past long gone but also evokes memories of more recent history.

Sun/Mon/Tues - 6, 7 & 8 January 2002 ~ Southern Tasmania (rest days)

Winsome and Lloyd based themselves at Sorell (near the Cambridge Airport) just outside Hobart for a few days. It was Lloyd's first visit to the island so they made sure they visited many of the key attractions for visitors in the southern part of the state.

The Tasmanian Waratah in full bloom on Mount Wellington. [Image: Winsome Bonham]
The Tasmanian Waratah in full bloom on Mount Wellington.
[Image: Winsome Bonham]

Winsome was rewarded during a trip to the summit of Mt Wellington when she saw a Tasmanian Waratah in full bloom. This flower is a close cousin to the spectacular red floral emblem of New South Wales.

A visit to the historic village of Richmond was essential. Both of our travellers loved seeing the Georgian era (1820s) architecture that is so well preserved in this town.

The historic Richmond Bridge is Australia's oldest. [Image: Winsome Bonham]
The historic Richmond Bridge is Australia's oldest.
[Image: Winsome Bonham]

The highlight is the sandstone bridge, which is the oldest surviving bridge in Australia.

They also visited Battery Point and the Shot Tower at Taroona. On Sunday they did a day trip across on the ferry to Bruny Island.

Strong winds delayed the start of the next flying sector. Even the locals weren't flying that day, so Lloyd thought that this was a sufficient caution.

The Russell Falls in the Mount Field National Park. [Image: Winsome Bonham]
The Russell Falls in the Mount Field National Park.
[Image: Winsome Bonham]

They took advantage of another day on the ground by touring the Midlands, and seeing the historic town of Oatlands and coming back to Hobart via Mount Field National Park. Winsome loved the walk up to the Russell Falls.

Wednesday 9 January 2002 ~ Cambridge to Strahan

It was time to get back in the Cessna and hit the lighthouse trail once more.

They tracked all the way south to Maatsuyker Island. This is the southernmost light in Australian waters. Although a GRP cabinet has replaced the historic light, there is still a human presence during the summer months on the island with a volunteer weather watcher keeping an eye on things.

They had now "turned the corner" and were heading up the West Coast of Tasmania. The long extensive sandy beaches along this coast really surprised Winsome since she was expecting a rugged coastline.

Even so, not far inland is the World Heritage South West Wilderness Area with its spectacular mountain scenery, alpine lakes and in places, almost impenetrable forest.

Tracy who lent Lloyd and Winsome a car while at Strahan. [Image: Winsome Bonham]
Tracy who lent Lloyd and Winsome a car while at Strahan.
[Image: Winsome Bonham]

Half way along the West Coast is Macquarie Harbour. The size of this Harbour impressed our aviators. There are arguments over whether it's bigger than Sydney Harbour. The "SydHarb" unit of measure is evidently a very fluid thing.

At the entrance to the harbour are the infamous Hells Gates. This location represents a lighthouse spotter's dream. Here you have the "trifecta", three lighthouses, all in one view. There is Cape Sorell (Tasmania's second tallest light) and the two white hexagonal wooden structures on the tiny islands of Entrance and Bonnet. These could be the teeth in the mouth of Hells Gates.

Lloyd watches Steve from Seair refueling RNL at Strahan. [Image: Winsome Bonham]
Lloyd watches Steve from Seair refueling RNL at Strahan.
[Image: Winsome Bonham]

Winsome and Lloyd spent the night at Strahan. This town is the base for the Gordon River wilderness tourism. On a drive up to the famous mining centre of Queenstown, Winsome spotted some Christmas Bells in flower beside the road.

Christmas Bells flowering on the road to Queenstown.[Image: Winsome Bonham]
Christmas Bells flowering on the road to Queenstown.
[Image: Winsome Bonham]

Thursday 10 January ~ Strahan to King Island

The final sector of the trip was north, and back into Bass Strait.

Lloyd meeting David Brewster, the Mayor of King Island. [Photograph: Winsome Bonham]
Lloyd meeting David Brewster, the Mayor of King Island.
[Photograph: Winsome Bonham]

King Island was to be their final stopover of the trip. There are two lighthouses here, one at Currie and of course, Cape Wickham, the tallest lighthouse in Australia.

How appropriate that this great light was the final light for the trip. A very fitting way to complete "Tasmanian Lighthouses from the Air".

Lloyd and Winsome called in on Malcolm on the way home. [Photograph: Winsome Bonham]
Lloyd and Winsome called in on Malcolm on the way home.
[Photograph: Winsome Bonham]

Lloyd returning the life raft to Concept Aviation. [Photograph: Winsome Bonham]
Lloyd returning the life raft to Concept Aviation.
[Photograph: Winsome Bonham]

1. Tasmanian Lighthouses together with more details on Winsome and Lloyd's recent trip will feature in the Winter 2002 edition of the magazine 40 Degrees South. The publication date is 6 June 2002. See www.fortysouth.com.au for details on how to get a copy.

David Hurburgh and his son in Hobart. [Photograph: David Hurburgh]
David Hurburgh and his son in Hobart.
[Photograph: David Hurburgh]

2. David Hurburgh, the author of this series of articles "Lighthouses From the Air", has a strong attachment to lighthouses. His great-great grandfather Captain Henry Hurburgh was the first superintendent of the Goose Island Lighthouse in Bass Strait in the period 1843-1852.

The Holloway Point Lighthouse on Flinders Island. [Photograph: Winsome Bonham] << Click for larger image.
Click to view lighthouse locationThe Holloway Point Lighthouse on Flinders Island.
[Photograph: Winsome Bonham]

The Low Head Lighthouse near Georgetown. [Photograph: Winsome Bonham] << Click for larger image.
Click to view lighthouse locationThe Low Head Lighthouse near Georgetown.
[Photograph: Winsome Bonham]

The Low Head Lead near Georgetown. [Photograph: Winsome Bonham] << Click for larger image.
Click to view lighthouse locationThe Low Head Lead near Georgetown.
[Photograph: Winsome Bonham]

The Tamar River Front and Rear Lead Lights at Low Head. [Photograph: Winsome Bonham] << Click for larger image.
Click to view lighthouse locationThe Tamar River Front and Rear Lead Lights at Low Head.
[Photograph: Winsome Bonham]

The Mersey Bluff Lighthouse at Devonport. [Photograph: Winsome Bonham] << Click for larger image.
Click to view lighthouse locationThe Mersey Bluff Lighthouse at Devonport.
[Photograph: Winsome Bonham]

The Round Hill Point near Burnie. [Photograph: Winsome Bonham] << Click for larger image.
Click to view lighthouse locationThe Round Hill Point near Burnie.
[Photograph: Winsome Bonham]

The Table Cape Lighthouse near Wynyard. [Photograph: Winsome Bonham] << Click for larger image.
Click to view lighthouse locationThe Table Cape Lighthouse near Wynyard.
[Photograph: Winsome Bonham]

The Rocky Cape Lighthouse. [Photograph: Winsome Bonham] << Click for larger image.
Click to view lighthouse locationThe Rocky Cape Lighthouse.
[Photograph: Winsome Bonham]

The Eddystone Point Lighthouse. [Photograph: Winsome Bonham] << Click for larger image.
Click to view lighthouse locationThe Eddystone Point Lighthouse.
[Photograph: Winsome Bonham]

The Cape Tourville Lighthouse. [Photograph: Winsome Bonham] << Click for larger image.
Click to view lighthouse locationThe Cape Tourville Lighthouse.
[Photograph: Winsome Bonham]

The Chicken Point Lighthouse on Schouten Island. [Photograph: Winsome Bonham] << Click for larger image.
Click to view lighthouse locationThe Chicken Point Lighthouse on Schouten Island.
[Photograph: Winsome Bonham]

The Point Home Lookout Lighthouse near Triabunna. [Photograph: Winsome Bonham] << Click for larger image.
Click to view lighthouse locationThe Point Home Lookout Lighthouse near Triabunna.
[Photograph: Winsome Bonham]

The Lachlan Island Lighthouse. [Photograph: Winsome Bonham] << Click for larger image.
Click to view lighthouse locationThe Lachlan Island Lighthouse.
[Photograph: Winsome Bonham]

The Iron Pot Lighthouse. [Photograph: Winsome Bonham] << Click for larger image.
Click to view lighthouse locationThe Iron Pot Lighthouse.
[Photograph: Winsome Bonham]

The Cape Bruny Lighthouse. [Photograph: Winsome Bonham] << Click for larger image.
Click to view lighthouse locationThe Cape Bruny Lighthouse.
[Photograph: Winsome Bonham]

The Actaeon Island Lighthouse. [Photograph: Winsome Bonham] << Click for larger image.
Click to view lighthouse locationThe Actaeon Island Lighthouse.
[Photograph: Winsome Bonham]

The Tasman Island Lighthouse. [Photograph: Winsome Bonham] << Click for larger image.
Click to view lighthouse locationThe Tasman Island Lighthouse.
[Photograph: Winsome Bonham]

The Blinking Billy Lighthouse on the Derwent Estuary. [Photograph: Winsome Bonham] << Click for larger image.
Click to view lighthouse locationThe Blinking Billy Lighthouse on the Derwent Estuary.
[Photograph: Winsome Bonham]

The Maatsuyker Island Lighthouse. [Photograph: Winsome Bonham] << Click for larger image.
Click to view lighthouse locationThe Maatsuyker Island Lighthouse.
[Photograph: Winsome Bonham]

The Low Rocky Point Lighthouse. [Photograph: Winsome Bonham] << Click for larger image.
Click to view lighthouse locationThe Low Rocky Point Lighthouse.
[Photograph: Winsome Bonham]

The Cape Sorell Lighthouse near Hells Gates. [Photograph: Winsome Bonham] << Click for larger image.
Click to view lighthouse locationThe Cape Sorell Lighthouse near Hells Gates.
[Photograph: Winsome Bonham]

The Entrance Island Lighthouse at Hells Gates. [Photograph: Winsome Bonham] << Click for larger image.
Click to view lighthouse locationThe Entrance Island Lighthouse at Hells Gates.
[Photograph: Winsome Bonham]

The Bonnet Island Lighthouse at Hells Gates. [Photograph: Winsome Bonham] << Click for larger image.
Click to view lighthouse locationThe Bonnet Island Lighthouse at Hells Gates.
[Photograph: Winsome Bonham]

The Sandy Cape Lighthouse. [Photograph: Winsome Bonham] << Click for larger image.
Click to view lighthouse locationThe Sandy Cape Lighthouse.
[Photograph: Winsome Bonham]

The Bluff Hill Lighthouse. [Photograph: Winsome Bonham] << Click for larger image.
Click to view lighthouse locationThe Bluff Hill Lighthouse.
[Photograph: Winsome Bonham]

The Stokes Point Lighthouse On King Island. [Photograph: Winsome Bonham] << Click for larger image.
Click to view lighthouse locationThe Stokes Point Lighthouse On King Island.
[Photograph: Winsome Bonham]

The Currie Harbour Lighthouse On King Island. [Photograph: Winsome Bonham] << Click for larger image.
Click to view lighthouse locationThe Currie Harbour Lighthouse On King Island.
[Photograph: Winsome Bonham]

The Cape Wickham Lighthouse on King Island. [Photograph: Winsome Bonham] << Click for larger image.
Click to view lighthouse locationThe Cape Wickham Lighthouse on King Island.
[Photograph: Winsome Bonham]

2002 LoA Inc Annual Dinner

[Malcolm Macdonald <keeper@lighthouses.org.au> with additions by Ed Kavaliunas <edkav@pipeline.com.au>]

Heading Back to Wollongong

Having visited Barranjoey we head back down to Sydney to get Denise back to Darling Harbour, so that she can host the guests traveling by bus from Sydney to the dinner. Denise doesn't share Malcolm's optimism about making it in time. We arrive in Sydney city at about 4pm and safely deposit Denise.

Then begins a circuitous route in an attempt to get out of Sydney before we are somehow miraculously propelled on to a road that has signs to Wollongong on it. Phew! Love Sydney!

The closer we get to Wollongong, the heavier and heavier the cloud cover looks, until we are suddenly driving in persistent rain and through low cloud. When we left Barranjoey, we were basking in sunshine and high 20's temperature (they talk about Melbourne's fickle weather!!!).

The Breakwater re-lighting and LoA Inc Annual Dinner

The Breakwater light re-lit in true lighthouse weather. [Image: David Tease, Illawarra Mercury]
The Breakwater light re-lit in true lighthouse weather.
[Image: David Tease, Illawarra Mercury]

Despite the weather the dinner is a great success, with enough umbrellas for the hardy souls that made their way out to the breakwater, for the lighting (for the first time in 28 years) of the old Wollongong Lighthouse.

People are invited to inspect lighthouse. Despite the rain many locals have come down to watch.

One couple, the Hallams, were very excited to be there. They came from Nottingham, England to visit family in Wollongong and to see the two lighthouses and couldn't believe their luck.

They had gone onto Canberra and come back just in time to be there for the re-lighting.

The decision is made to re-light tower from inside. Col Markham, the local member, throws the switch in front of a small gathering in the lantern room.

As the light come back to life after 28 years there is a big cheers as well as beeping car horns.

Many people still queuing up to inspect tower. One local girl recounts her father taking her up when she was 3 years old.

Carol Herben who recently updated Fleming's 'White Towers of the Illawarra' was also present.

After the re-lighting we gather back at the restaurant to commence the dinner and welcome the guests.

Panel of Historic Lighthouses members, James Collocote, from South Africa, Christianne Villes from France, and Christian Lagerwall from Sweden. [Image: Ed Kavaliunas]
Panel of Historic Lighthouses members, James Collocote, from South Africa, Christianne Villes from France, and Christian Lagerwall from Sweden.
[Image: Ed Kavaliunas]

There are three Panel of Historic Lighthouses members, including James Collocote, from South Africa, Christianne Villes from France, and Christian Lagerwall from Sweden. Christianne Lagerwall is also secretary of the Swedish Lighthouse Society. They have been attending the IALA Conference at Darling Harbour in Sydney

Also present are the night's speakers, Brian Dooley, Acting Regional Director, Sydney/South Coast Region, Department of Land and Water Conservation, Brian Rogers, consulting Heritage Advisor to the Department on the restoration of the Breakwater lighthouse and the local State member for Wollongong, Col Markham MP. Kim Stephenson was also present from the Department of Land and Water Conservation.

We meet many faces that we have only heard of, or communicated with via email.

Out through the front of the Harbour Front Restaurant we look over Belmore Basin with the Breakwater Light still flashing in background.

Against one wall is a display of the various stages of the Breakwater Light' restoration.

Brian Dooley giving a presentation on the background of the restoration. [Image: Ed Kavaliunas]
Brian Dooley giving a presentation on the background of the restoration.
[Image: Ed Kavaliunas]

After the entrees are served there is a short address by Brian Dooley outlining the background of the restoration.

Unexpectedly we are presented with the book, "Swedish Lighthouses", plus badges, pins and stickers by Christian Lagerwall from Sweden.

The main course is served and this is followed by a presentation by Brian Rogers outlining the heritage considerations and their effect on restoration techniques. This includes a brief history, issues of period and matching of materials. Brian emphasises the enthusiasm of all involved, local businesses, sub contractors etc.

Rogers outlining the heritage considerations and their effect on restoration techniques. [Image: Ed Kavaliunas]
Rogers outlining the heritage considerations and their effect on restoration techniques.
[Image: Ed Kavaliunas]

The local member, Colin Markham MP, speaks about the significance and iconic status of the light to community.

Earlier in the day Australia Post has released a series of 4 lighthouse stamps, that John Ibbotson has brought with him, that are also passed around for guests to examine.

The door prize is drawn and Anne Clifford, Ian's partner is the winner and receives a copy of John, Ibbotson's new book "Lighthouses of Australia".

Ian and Anne in turn decide to kindly donate their copy for him to take back to the Swedish Lighthouse Society in appreciation of Christian Lagerwall's kind gifts earlier in the night.

Malcolm winds up the evening with an address to the gathering about the importance of the vision, being patient, getting communities involved in promoting, preserving and protecting their local lighthouses. He emphasises that to succeed in the objectives of Lighthouses of Australia Inc we must create an upward groundswell to reach those in authority.

A very successful evening closes.

From the left Brian Rogers, Ed Kavaliunas, Brian Dooley, Jeanette Dooley, Ian Clifford, Christianne Lagerwall, Christianne Villes. James Collocote and Malcolm Macdonald [Image: Sam Calder]
From the left Brian Rogers, Ed Kavaliunas, Brian Dooley, Jeanette Dooley, Ian Clifford, Christianne Lagerwall, Christianne Villes. James Collocote and Malcolm Macdonald
[Image: Sam Calder]

USLS Australian Tour Farewell Dinner

[Keith Banks <klbanks@ihug.com.au>]

This was the farewell dinner for all the American lighthouse folk on the tour provided by Bob Adams for the US Lighthouse Society and was held at the Novotel in St Kilda, Melbourne.

Lighthouses of Australia Inc was represented by Keith and Betty Banks, Malcolm Macdonald, Ed Kavaluinas, Marguerite and Nick Stephen, Craig Carvil and partner, John and Marilyn Ibbotson with Donald Walker arriving later in the evening.

The folk from the US Lighthouse Society enjoying their farewell dinner with their Australian Guests [Image: Mike Fisher]
The folk from the US Lighthouse Society enjoying their farewell dinner with their Australian Guests
[Image: Mike Fisher]

The entire dinner was a delight with everybody joining in to make it a wonderful night and a fitting occasion for the last night of their Australian tour that Bob Adams conducted so well according to all the remarks and jokes of the night that was flowing back and forth with some of our Australian wits coming out well on top.

John Ibbotson had a marvelous night reaping the profits from the huge sale of his book "Lighthouses of Australia - images from the end of an era"; well done John!

It would have to be one of the best books written, and John can look forward to paying the mortgage off.

John Ibbotson signing one of the many books he sold on the night [Image: Mike Fisher]
John Ibbotson signing one of the many books he sold on the night
[Image: Mike Fisher]

The reports that I received from our American friends was all good, saying they did enjoy all that our country had to offer and a special thankyou to us for the friendly way the Aussies accepted them and made them welcome. They also expressed their wish to come back and see more next time. I asked the question and was told during the dinner, how many in their association with the answer being 12,000

A lovely night had by all.

Johnsons on Maatsuyker Radio Interview

[Malcolm Macdonald <malcolm@lighthouses.org.au>]

On February 19th 2002 Vivian Schenker, the Breakfast presenter on Radio National, the Australian Broadcasting Corporation's national radio network interviewed Erica and Alan Johnson by phone from their new home, Maatsuyker Island, where they will be caretakers for the next 3 months.

Listen (requires RealAudio)

Appointed by Tasmanian National Parks and Wildlife Service, Erica talks about how they are settling in to the isolation and routines on the island.

The scenic, rugged and isolated Maatsuyker Island. [Image: Jeff Jennings]
The scenic, rugged and isolated Maatsuyker Island.
[Image: Jeff Jennings]


Letters & Notices

Thanks for Your Hospitality Australia

Dear Malcolm

Australia is a wonderful country. We first visited in 1998 and knew we would one day return not knowing when.

Bob Adam's lighthouse tour was perfect. Beautiful, historical architecture in the most magnificent places.

The folk from the US Lighthouse Society enjoying their farewell dinner with their Australian Guests. [Image: Mike Fisher]The people there are so much more friendly and courteous than in America, truly a vacation.

Please keep up the good work of educating people of the importance of lighthouses past, present and future. It was a pleasure to meet you after writing for so long.

Keep in touch with Bob Adams as he sure made the trip a joy also.

You may send me anything about lighthouse, especially your fine articles.

Mike and Susan Fisher <mfisher@ithink.net>
Lakeland
Florida.
USA

Lots of Fond Memories

Hello Malcolm

Thanks for sending me the lighthouse bulletins I spend hours browsing through the pages.

I find them very interesting brings lots of fond memories of the many pleasant hours I had working on them ,before I retired,

You have some good towers out there in Australia, also some nice offshore stations,

I look forward to seeing the April Bulletin.

Regards A.A.Dickman <a.a.dickman@blueyonder.co.uk>

Feel free to post any request, letters, notices here regarding research, events etc for any Australian Lighthouse on this notice board.

<keeper@lighthouses.org.au>


Department of Scrounge:

If anybody has any of this material on any Australian lighthouses including the ones listed at the Department of Scrounge it would appreciated, especially the high priority ones:

  • Original Colour Photographs
  • Historical Photographs or Postcards
  • History, experiences and anecdotes
  • Technical History

Please eMail <Keeper>


New Pages & Links

New Pages for Australia:

No new pages for Australia this month

New Links for Australia:

No new links for Australia this month

Also, New Links for World:

No new links for World this month

If your e-mail does not display in HTML these pages can be accessed from the "New Listing for Month Index" at <http://www.lighthouses.org.au/lights/New/Index%20New.htm>


Australian News:

Wollongong Breakwater Lighthouse Relit

[by Antony Field, Illawarra Mercury]

The night was perfect weather for ducks but that didn't stop 50 hardy souls from watching Wollongong's breakwater lighthouse shine for the first time in 28 years.

Gusty winds, continual rain and a grey sky failed to stop the crowd cheering and motorists from honking their horns as the light flashed out over Belmore Basin.

A small crowd gathers in the lantern room for the relighting. [Image: Sam Calder]
A small crowd gathers in the lantern room for the relighting.
[Image: Sam Calder]

Kim Stephenson from the Department of Water and Land Conservation said it was the type of weather the lighthouse was designed for.

Wollongong MP Colin Markham and the department's acting regional director Brian Dooley flicked the switch at 7.22pm, the exact time the lighthouse was first lit on March 1 1872.

The Breakwater Lighthouse brightens gloomy skies for the first time in 28 years. [Image: David Tease, Illawarra Mercury]
The Breakwater Lighthouse brightens gloomy skies for the first time in 28 years.
[Image: David Tease, Illawarra Mercury]

Ian Clifford acknowledged for his efforts

Ian Clifford acknowledged for his outstanding effort

Ian who played a major part towards the Breakwater Lighthouse being relit was rightfully acknowledged by Col Markham in the New South Wales Parliament the following day.

The extract from can be found in Hansard.

Ian was also the organiser for the 2002 LoA Inc Annual Dinner.

The light remained on until sunrise the next morning and will be lit in future to mark special events in Wollongong.

Rita and John Hallam from Nottingham England, visiting friends in Wollongong, turned up to see the wrought iron lighthouse restarted and even climbed the main tower.

"This is wonderful - I've got a heart condition and my husband has got a bad leg but we both made it up," Mrs Hallam said.

The couple rushed back from a trip to Canberra to see the lighthouse and said it reminded them of England.

Mr Hallam said he did not realise how beautiful Wollongong was until they arrived and Mrs Hallam said it had been the highlight of their Australian trip so far.

The breakwater lighthouse was relit to mark the completion of a two year, $300,000 restoration project and the visit to Wollongong of international lighthouse enthusiasts.

An early photograph of Wollongong Breakwater Lighthouse and the North Beach shoreline. [Image: Illawarra Mercury]
An early photograph of Wollongong Breakwater Lighthouse and the North Beach shoreline.
[Image: Illawarra Mercury]

Mr Markham said the event was a great day for Wollongong, especially as the lighthouse was an icon to so many people.

"It has sat here deteriorating for decades and it was just about ready to fall over. It has slowly been restored over the years, sandblasted and painted and new glass installed."

Ian Clifford, a member of the Lighthouses of Australia, was instrumental in getting the lighthouse operating again.

He said the lighthouse was unusual because it was made of iron, rather than brick or block and only one other similar lighthouse exists, which is in Ulladulla.

Mr Clifford said the lens was the same one that was used when the lighthouse went out of commission in 1974 and he was able to fit a modern lamp which used the same flashing sequence.

Point Lonsdale Celebrates 100th Anniversary

The celebration of the 100th anniversary of the first exhibition of the current Point Lonsdale Lighthouse was blessed with a good sunny day and gentle breeze.

Commissioned on the 20th March 1902, the tower replaced the original wooden tower that had stood nearby since 1863.

The Lonsdale Lighthouse celebrates her 100th birthday. [Image: Laurie Sharp]
The Lonsdale Lighthouse celebrates her 100th birthday.
[Image: Laurie Sharp]

Laurie Sharp and myself set up a promotional table for Lighthouses of Australia (LoA Inc) at the beginning of the pathway leading to the lighthouse. Denise Shultz also joined us to help us promote LoA Inc during the celebrations.

An early arrival was Max Huxley, son of Cyril Huxley, a former keeper from Gabo, followed by Keith Banks who was at Wilsons Promontory as well as Gabo.

 

Lighthouse Keepers

1852 Signalmaster
Captain J. Preston

1901 George Stevens, headkeeper

1902 A. J. Synnot appointed first lighthouse keeper of the new Lonsdale light.

1903 Thomas McBain
1906 Alexander Dick
1911 Alfred Hackett
1912 George Barding
1917 Horace Crowther
1920 Tom Wareham
1922 William Dunk
1926 Norman Hunt
1930 T. Mouchemore
1941 George Ferrier
1943 Albert Lee
1946 Don Garnham
1947 Grenville `Rod' Roddick
1950 Colin Ferrier
1950 Enrie Dickens
1953 Harold Stringer
1959 Geoffrey Ferrier
1959 Tony Robinson
1960 Jack McCleary
1963 Murray Shapter
1964 William Nelson
1966 Ned Stonehouse
1973 Bill Huggins
1973 Peter Lewry
1974 Ken Burgess
1975 Ian Fitzsimmons

[List compiled by Queenscliff Historical Museum]

Edwin Synnot, great grandson of the first lightkeeper. [Image: Laurie Sharp]
Edwin Synnot, great grandson of the first lightkeeper.
[Image: Laurie Sharp]

Our special guest was Edwin Synnot, the grandson of the last keeper in the original wooden lighthouse, who was also the first keeper in the current Point Lonsdale tower.

Bob Coate, the great grandson of the builder of the lighthouse. [Image: Laurie Sharp]
Bob Coate, the great grandson of the builder of the lighthouse.
[Image: Laurie Sharp]

Denise arrives to help us promote LoA Inc. [Image: Laurie Sharp]
Denise arrives to help us promote LoA Inc.
[Image: Laurie Sharp]

Bob Coate, the great grandson of the contractor, George Coate who built the light, was also present as a guest of the Borough of Queenscliffe Mayor, Val Lawrence.

The celebrations began with a picnic lunch and had a steady stream of visitors that continued through out the day.

The formal part of the day began the national anthem followed by the Mayor welcoming guests including former keepers, pilots, signalmen and their families and descendants. She also gave a brief history of the Point Lonsdale Lighthouse.

The Honourable Sherryl Garbutt, Minister for Environment and Conservation launched the <<coastal>> plan for managing reserve that the lighthouse is in. The plan a final result of many years of consultation between her department who controls the area and local residents and users.

The 100th anniversary Commemorative plaque. [Image: Keith Banks]
The 100th anniversary Commemorative plaque.
[Image: Keith Banks]

Next a Commemorative plaque recognising the service of all those associated with the tower was unveiled.

The Rev. Geoff Traill, of the local Uniting Church, lead a service of thanksgiving and rededication of Point Lonsdale Lighthouse

This was an ecumenical service that included the rededication and blessing. The service was closed by Rev. Noyoun (Noah) Park from the Geelong Mission to Seafarers.

The promotional table very successful. Many visitors had either been to the site or had heard of it. Most others showed an interest in our objectives. It also gave us a point where we met and discussed issues local members of parliament, dignitaries, and the Minister, The Honourable Sherryl Garbutt.

Thanks to Laurie and Denise for helping with the LoA Inc promotional table throughout the day.

My love affair with Point Lonsdale
[Rodney Nicholson]

My love affair with the lighthouse began in the 1960s when I started photographing her with my mum's box brownie and further creative attempts were made in the 1970s and 80s. The 1990s produced many new angles, moon rises and foregrounds of natural flora, touched with beautiful dawn and sunset light.

I took a new tack `Brushed with Light' and a new series began. Mood evoking time exposures using ebb and flood tide lights, creating surreal images with available light.

I have watched in awe from beyond the waves as she changes colour at the end of the day, surfaced from the shipwreck seabed on the outer reef to find her standing silent guarding over me.

I've painted her three coats bottom to top, so she could shine out to sea. Left the heads for six day fishing trips to watch her disappear and to feel the joy on return as she stands tall on the headland shining light, greets and guides me home safely.

I remember the joy of many years from my bedroom window I would watch, head on the pillow, say goodnight to the lighthouse.

To awaken to the windowpane rattling, it must be foggy out to sea. There she blows again; it's the foghorn sending deep, resonant shivers right through me.

Happy birthday Lonsdale Light you are a worthy title owner to me.

Bustard Head Lighthouse Association Takes Possession

As reported in the October 2001 Bulletin after a campaign lasting more than a decade, the Bustard Head Lighthouse Association have been given a lease over the site surrounding the lighthouse.

Well recently, Des and Betty Mergard led a party from the Bustard Head Lighthouse Association north to take possession of the site. They raised the Australian flag and everybody sang the national anthem.

The Bustard Head Lighthouse Association raising the flag and singing the national anthem. [Image: ABC Wide Bay]
The Bustard Head Lighthouse Association raising the flag and singing the national anthem.
[Image: ABC Wide Bay]

Their intention is to renovate the remaining houses to honour the site's history and once this is done the houses will be available to visitors for information and accommodation.

One of the heavily vandalised cottages at Bustard Head. [Image: ABC Wide Bay]
One of the heavily vandalised cottages at Bustard Head.
[Image: ABC Wide Bay]

Anyone who is interested in joining the Association or supporting the group in any way can contact the Association through Stuart Buchanan on (07) 3289 1827 or write to Bustard Head Lighthouse Association PO Box 90 SAMFORD Queensland 4520.

LINKS: New Book to be Released on Bustard Head
Plight of Bustard Head Featured on TV and in New Book
Progress at Bustard Head
Update On The Progress Of Bustard Head
Bustard Head Lightstation to be Leased

Cape Leeuwin and Cape Naturaliste to be Leased

The Western Australian State Government on December 1st 2001 last called for expressions of interest from interested parties to manage the Cape Leeuwin and Cape Naturaliste lighthouse tourist operations and precincts.

The Cape Naturaliste Lighthouse. [Image: Annette Flotwell]
The Cape Naturaliste Lighthouse.
[Image: Annette Flotwell]

The current operator of the Cape Leeuwin is the Augusta Margaret River Tourist Association. They are a non profit local body managing the lightstation on a short lease and have put in a submission.

4 submissions have passed the first stage but so far they have not been made public,

The Cape Leeuwin Lighthouse. [Image: Martin Grundy]
The Cape Leeuwin Lighthouse.
[Image: Martin Grundy]

The Western Australia Department of Conservation and Land Management (CALM) have draft proposals which cover heritage and environmental issues and restrictions.

The 4 parties on the short list have to put in more detailed proposals by the end
of April.

It should be known by about May this year who the successful tenderer is and what their plans for the area are.

Paul Sofilas who works for the Augusta Margaret River Tourist Association as a tour guide said:

"I've been living on site as a caretaker for 12 months so have become even more attached to the Cape than before. It is pretty untouched at present, which means it is a snapshot of the past or time capsule you could say. So hopefully they can retain the integrity of the site for everyone to experience."

The Cape Leeuwin Lightstation. [Image: City of Bunbury]
The Cape Leeuwin Lightstation.
[Image: City of Bunbury]

If you know of any news or event effecting an Australian Lighthouse please forward it to us so we can publish in the Monthly Bulletin.


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Photographs & Contributions:

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