Lighthouses of Australia Project - JULY 99 BULLETIN
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Dear Friends

The Lighthouse Project Site is Now Searchable

Thanks to the courtesy of Australia's Cultural Network the 'Lighthouses of Australia' site is now searchable.

Just enter a keyword such as the name of a lighthouse such as 'Eddystone' and click the 'Search' button and all the pages that contain that keyword will be displayed.

The service is available because the Project site is a registered Australia's Cultural Network site.

Enter Terms:
 
Search courtesy of Australia's Cultural Network
Australia's Cultural Network logo

 

 

 

Lighthouse Digest Article Features Lighthouse Site

Jim Merkel has written an article outlining the strength of lighthouse site on the Internet called " The Internet: Strengthening the International Community of Lighthouse Lovers" for Lighthouse Digest.

It has been published in the June Edition hardcopy and there is a copy on the Net at <http://www.lhdigest.com/archives/1999/June_1999/Internet.htm>.

The 'Lighthouses of Australia Project' is extensively quoted and referred to in the article, thuis demonstrating the strength and the relevance of this site.

Moving Hatteras Month

OK, it's not an Australian Lighthouse, but it is a fantastic event and here are a couple of great Internet sites covering it.

Cape Hatteras Lighthouse Relocation Articles and Images: With daily move data chart Cape Hatteras Lighthouse Relocation Articles and Images:
With daily move data chart New.gif (158 bytes)
Moving the Hatteras Light:
An animated info-graphic by Stephen A. CampbellNew.gif (158 bytes)
Moving the Hatteras Light: An animated info-graphic by Stephen A. Campbell

See the relocating of Caloundra Lighthouse in Queensland below.


Tasmanian Expedition Report: (Part 3 of 4):

Part 1: May 1999 Bulletin
Part 2: June 1999 Bulletin

[by Deborah Taylor]

On the road again through heavy forests and ever winding roads. Now sometimes people thinks the same thing at the same time. Apparently Malcolm and I were deliberating whether to express the obvious, but not so far Smithy, he quietly broke into a chorus of Monty Python's "I'm a lumberjack and I'm alright". Hmm. Okay? Of course Smithy, in typical style, was wearing a lumberjack's checked flannel shirt!

Hours of travelling through changing forest and winding roads we find a pub oasis in the middle of nowhere. The Wilderness Hotel, at Derwent Bridge, is a lodge like. A substantually large and impressive building made from local timbers, the massive fire places boast an abundance of fuel.

Moving along, we decide to check out Lake St Clair but as evening is fast approaching we decide to pass on the nine dollar sticker. Round the carpark and out again we pass a hitch-hiker sitting on the side of the road. We'll we all thought the same thing at the same time again, backed up, rearaanged the gear, and packed him in. Benjamin is on his way to Hobart after spending eight days walking and living off the land on the famous 'Overland Track' that goes from Cradle Mountain to Lake St Clair.

Hobart is still a long way off and night is closing in fast. New Norfolk seems the most likely place to stay and besides that we are desperate for a trip to the laundry!

Arriving at the caravan park fairly late, we set up for the night while Smithy whips up an impressive feast as usual along with a contribution of huge mushrooms found by Benjamin the previous day.

Well fed and exhausted, we are ready to turn in for the night when Smithy finds a message on his mobile phone. Deciding this can't wait for the morning, we run over to where Malcolm's staying to tell him that he has been contacted by the BBC in London.

Day 6: Tuesday 20.4.99

Many, many, many coins later our laundry is dry so off we go. Now I thinks I mentioned that Malcolm's obsessed with lighthouses and I'm obsessed with houses, well Smithy's obsessed with churchs. funny lot, aren't we? St Matthews Anglican Church built in 1823. Intuitively we all think the same thing at the same time, again! Malcolm and I know he's itching to check this out. Out with the cameras and tripod, the four of us cross the road to visit the church.

Smithy feels that a church is a sanctuary, that is any church of any denomination has a certain feel about it that no other building has. It's like the old story of the camera capturing the soul. This is what he does. The muted light on the polished stone and ancient wood evokes the depths of silence. Benjamin found a piano and played this soft ethereal piece of music.

Hobart! I can't decide if I want to live in Strahan or Hobart, oh well another day. Dropped Benjamin off at the door of his friends house and said we'd catch up with him on the ferry back. Malcolm is contacted by the BBC again, interview is teed up for tomorrow.

Heading now for Bruny Island, all is set up to meet with the keeper. If we find the right road we can just catch the 12:30 Ferry. Long drive down, we arrive with just a few minutes to spare. The ferry takes about twenty minutes to reach the island then it is another hours drive to the Cape to meet Andy Gregory, one of the last group of lightkeepers to man the Cape Bruny Lighthouse.

The Cape Bruny is the oldest Federal Lighthouse [Photograph: Ed Kavaliunas]
The Cape Bruny is the oldest Federal Lighthouse
[Photograph: Ed Kavaliunas]

Built in 1836, the lighthouse is a solid almost squat medium sized tower with a handsome black enamel painted door and the date above the lintel. Andy greats us in the car park just below the pathway to the lighthouse. Coats, hats, scarves etc., we rug up as the weather starts to close in.

You can tell alot about a person in a very short time just as you can tell of their intentions by incidental matters. Such is the case when we are asked to remove any clothing containing moisture. The reason is because once the moisture is inside it is trapped there for good and penetrates the walls to cause immense damage. A quick glance reveals patchy areas of repair work. These structures, he informs me were never designed to be locked up, hence he keeps an electric heater going everyday to minimise damage.

Andy's dedication to this old lighthouse becomes more apparent as we learn of his endless petitions for help. Though he does not receive any renumeration for his dedication, a nominal fee of ten dollars per head for a tour goes directly back to maintaining the lighthouse. What more do we need to say?

Up the spiral staircase of ornate cast iron, we reach the upper level housing the crystal beacon, but there is definitely something odd here. Of all the lighthouses so far, we have viewed them from all angles, but only from the outside. But being inside, here next to the beacon a strong pervasive feeling gives you the realisation that the lighthouse is dead. They are nearly all dead.

It is a painful sadness when one realises the extent to which technology has alienated its own creators. Andy, like anyone else knows the hardships that the lighthouse keepers and their families endured, will tell you their lot was anything but the romantic vision we conjure up. but nonetheless, these structures and their machines (what's left) are imbued with history, dedications and a sense of purpose.

Talk to anyone who has a love of old machines or anything else, whether it be old cars, steam trains whatever, you may know what they are talking about specifically, but you cannot help but be enthralled by their passion.

It was like this all the way through our trip. From people who lived with the lighthouse in the background of their lives to the the men at AMSA (Australian Maritime Safety Authority) who viewed their collection of artefacts with immense pride to people who wrote books, kept old photographs of the lighthouse on their bedroom wall, right across to people like Andy who kept going regardless.

Many keepers have had their ashes scattered from the Cape Bruny balcony. [Photograph: Ed Kavaliunas]
Many keepers have had their ashes scattered from the Cape Bruny balcony.
[Photograph: Ed Kavaliunas]

At this point I wish to note the when we first ascended the tower Andy drew our attention to seven or eight plaques bearing the names of former keepers who had requested their ashes be scatter from the balcony of this very tower. Andy expressed concern that when the beaurocrats are making the decisions about the future of this site, and whether is should be turned into just another upmarket tourist resort, that they will respect that this is in a sense a sacred place for many lighthouse keepers and their families.

Strangely enough as I am writing this it is now pelting down with rain which leads me to the next phase of the photographic expedition. A bit of a walk through heath and bracken clears the way for a track up to the next hill over from the lighthouse - Smithy is never, never content to take an easy shot. Malcolm and I tag along and eventually we reach the new lighthouse, the small fibre glass tower holding the electronic beacon.

Smithy is battered by the elements as he photographs Cape Bruny. [Photograph: Deborah Taylor]
Smithy is battered by the elements as he photographs Cape Bruny.
[Photograph: Deborah Taylor]

The weather is closing in faster than we brace ourselves from the onslaught. A frozen furious wind belts around us and the rain stings like needles on our faces. After the tripod falls a few times, Smithy is forced to retreat back with us (cringing behind the new tower) to find some relief. Well this is quite a funny thing because there is no relief, it's a bit like sheep standing around a dead stick in the middle of the paddock in the middle of the storm.

Cringing behind the new tower, there is no relief from the squall for Smithy and Malcolm. [Photograph: Deborah Taylor]
Cringing behind the new tower, there is no relief from the squall for Smithy and Malcolm.
[Photograph: Deborah Taylor]

Smithy ventures off again for one last try and tells Malcolm to keep still, at which he laughs, so I can brace myself against him to take a shot of Smithy taking a shot of the old lighthouse. In the end we had to concede, so down we go towards the beach to find the little graves of the children who were laid to rest all those years ago.

The two infant graves at Cape Bruny. [Photograph: Ed Kavaliunas]
The two infant graves at Cape Bruny.
[Photograph: Ed Kavaliunas]

When you see these little graves as we did at Table Cape, Bruny and Eddystone you will never again have any illusions of a romantic life.

Down to the beach, we seem to have lost Smithy again, he's off trying to find that magic shot. Strangely enough after leaving the beacon the weather subsides and we have about half an hour left to take in the beach and the convict garden before heading back to the ferry.

Any sees us off, entrusting us with a book from his own collection (a 1983 government report on the future of keepers), one last long distance shot of the lighthouse and its cottages then the long road back to the ferry.

Back on the mainland, make our way to Cygnet, pub dinner then off to check in to our accommodation, a long day, in bed by 9:30pm.

Day 7: Wednesday 21.4.99

Heading for Hobart now, via the Huon Valley, beautiful orchards and countryside, there were many times when we wished our itinerary allowed more time to do the touristy bit. thought it might be a good idea to find accommodation first after last nights tight squeeze.

Accommodation organised, AMSA is our next stop. It is here that we find invaluable information and elusive photographs to fill the missing gaps. Malcolm is in archive heaven and we try to our best not to impose to much on their busy agenda. We arrive during the course of in important meeting but nonetheless they make as welcome and help us in every way possible.

Steve demonstrates remarkable patience as we rearrange his office into a studio to photograph some of the artefacts from various lighthouses, while Syd made himself available, when he could, to bring us things to photograph. Steve uncovered an old generator and books and pieces about the place.

The old Eddystone Generator is one of the artefacts at the AMSA Depot in Hobart. [Photograph: Deborah Taylor]
The old Eddystone Generator is one of the artefacts at the AMSA Depot in Hobart.
[Photograph: Deborah Taylor]

The old Goose Island apparatus and a collection of signal flags are also at the AMSA Depot in Hobart. [Photograph: Deborah Taylor]
The old Goose Island apparatus and a collection of signal flags are also at the AMSA Depot in Hobart.
[Photograph: Deborah Taylor]

Spent a good part of the day here and Malcolm conducted his interview with the BBC from the tea room. In the throes of his dry, 'just the facts' interview he's madly signalling Smithy to stop walking around in his squeaky boots.

Deciding we will have to retrieve the rest tomorrow we make our way to the Tasman Peninsula. At Eaglehawk Neck we view the Blowhole, the Tasman Arch and the Devil's Kitchen, all remarkable rock formations along the coast. Long drive down to Port Arthur arriving twenty minutes before closing time.

It is difficult for a visitor to comprehend what the feeling is here. Senseless and obscene human cruelty is juxtaposed with plastic novelties and 'in your face' tabloid like facts to tantalize! Surely there is a more sensitive way to tell history. This was not a historical setting for life and living, it was a setting for insanity, torture, depravity and death, not to mention the addition of recent history to compound the issue.

We all returned to the car park somewhat confused about the mixed messages.

Long drive back to Hobart. Fish and chips for tea, Malcolm's lost in the phone booth again, I am soundly beaten at table tennis by Smithy.

Day 8: Thursday 22.4.99

Cold morning, snow on top of Mount Wellington. First stop, meet Lyndal at AMSA to organise remaining photos and information, for collection later in the day.

Next stop is Hobart Ports Corporation to meet Lance Morgan, lost again, reaching for directions, arrive close to appointed time.

Ports and Harbours have kindly offered to take us out to photograph Iron Pot Lighthouse off Cape Direction at the mouth of the Derwent River, about forty five minutes away.

Steve and Leigh from Hobart Ports and Harbours take us out to Iron Pot. [Photograph: Deborah Taylor]
Steve and Leigh from Hobart Ports and Harbours take us out to Iron Pot.
[Photograph: Deborah Taylor]

We meet with Steve Cooper and Leigh Dwyer, who take us on the pilot boat down to the islands (a nice safe boat!). Iron Port is a small lighthouse on a small rocky island, Steve anchors the pilot boat a few hundred metres from the island and Leigh takes us across in the dinghy. We have to work fast because we only have twenty minutes as Steve and Leigh have to return to the Port before returning to guide a ship in.

Iron Pot Lighthouse and remains of keepers complex. [Photograph: Ed Kavaliunas]
Iron Pot Lighthouse and remains of keepers complex.
[Photograph: Ed Kavaliunas]

A fascinating little island which once housed three lighthouse families, remains of the cottages are merely foundations and lines on the rock surface, while an old gantry still stands. The island is so small that Smithy was constantly telling Malcolm and I to this out of the picture, but then this wasn't all that unusual.

Smithy on Iron Pot with the Gantry and Pilot boat in background.[Photograph: Deborah Taylor]
Smithy on Iron Pot with the Gantry and Pilot boat in background.
[Photograph: Deborah Taylor]

Leigh returned to pick us up and take us back to the pilot boat, then back to Hobart. Nice safe boat.

A very enjoyable trip and interesting company too.

Now this comes a time when mutiny is inevitable! Archives and libraries have no bargaining power today over a heady collection of galleries and cafes called Salamanca Place. But, business before pleasure. Malcolm sends us off to photograph a tiny Lighthouse call Blinking Billy, a guiding light situated at Illurick Point south of the City. This old wooden structure stands over the remains of a battery set up during the Second World War.

The Blinking Billy Lighthouse on Illurick Point, Hobart. [Photograph: Ed Kavaliunas]
The Blinking Billy Lighthouse on Illurick Point, Hobart.
[Photograph: Ed Kavaliunas]

Returning to Salamanca Place we meet up with Malcolm for coffee after his lunch with Marlie Bryant to discuss her book about the history of the Iron Port Lighthouse. The agenda is organised for the rest of the day. Malcolm is off to contact Archives Australia and the Tasmanian Archives, the Tasmanian Library, the magazine 40° South, back to AMSA to collect the photos and cuttings then spend the evening with Pat O'Malley to discuss a collection of photographs taken by Pat, while Smithy and I waft around Salamanca Place!

Galleries and cafes closing, make our way to St. David's Cathedral then dinner at in Indian Restaurant. Taxi home only to discover we left a bag at the restaurant? Malcolm drives as back, lost again! Hobart is a beautiful city, it just that it's full of one way streets.

The final part of this four part Expedition Report will appear in the August 99 Bulletin.


Notice Board:

Any Inquiries or Notices Regarding Australian Lighthouse are welcome here

Please eMail <Keeper>


Department of Scrounge:

If anybody has any of this material on any Australian lighthouses including the ones listed at the Department of Scrounge it would appreciated, especially the high priority ones:

  • Original Colour Photographs
  • Historical Photographs or Postcards
  • History, experiences and anecdotes
  • Technical History

Please eMail <Keeper>


New Pages for Australia:

The Cape Bruny Lighthouse The Cape Bruny Lighthouse New.gif (158 bytes)
The Iron Pot Lighthouse on the DerwentNew.gif (158 bytes) The Iron Pot Lighthouse on the Derwent
The Table Cape Lighthouse The Table Cape Lighthouse New.gif (158 bytes)

If your e-mail does not display in HTML these pages can be accessed from the "New Listing for Month Index" at <http://www.lighthouses.org.au/lights/New/Index%20New.htm>


New Links for Australia:

No new links for Australia this month

If your e-mail does not display in HTML these pages can be accessed from the "New Listing for Month Index" at <http://www.lighthouses.org.au/lights/New/Index%20New.htm>


Also, New Links for World:

The Cape Irozaki Lighthouse on the Izu Peninsula in Japan The Cape Irozaki Lighthouse on the Izu Peninsula in Japan New.gif (158 bytes)
The Lighthouses in Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, GermanyNew.gif (158 bytes) The Lighthouses in Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, Germany
 The Cape Egmont Lighthouse, New Zealand The Cape Egmont Lighthouse, New Zealand New.gif (158 bytes)
The Official site of the Japanese Maritime Safety AgencyNew.gif (158 bytes) The Official site of the Japanese Maritime Safety Agency
The Lighthouses of California by Diana Liston The Lighthouses of California by Diana ListonNew.gif (158 bytes)
Lorne's American LighthousesNew.gif (158 bytes) Lorne's American Lighthouses
Lorne's Canadian Lighthouses Lorne's Canadian LighthousesNew.gif (158 bytes)

If your e-mail does not display in HTML these pages can be accessed from the "New Listing for Month Index" at <http://www.lighthouses.org.au/lights/New/Index%20New.htm>


Australian News:

Public Wins Battle of Access to Wilsons Promontary Lighthouse

The proposed privatisation of the Wilsons Promontory Lighthouse Complex has fallen through with the developer withdrawing from negotiations.

The Wilsons Promontory Lighthouse will remain accessable to the public. [Photograph: Kim Shimmin]
The Wilsons Promontory Lighthouse will remain accessable to the public.
[Photograph: Kim Shimmin]

Conditions such as public access to the tower and accommodation in hand with a shorter lease (21 years instead of 42 years) had been introduced by the Victorian State Government in response to pressure from groups such as bushwalkers, environmentalist and lighthouse enthusiasts. They had staged a protest walk for the lighthouse to the steps of parliament.

The developer, Mr Ken Latona, withdrew after hearing of the new policy from Marie Tehan, the Minister for Conservation and Land Management.

The Minister said that Parks Victoria would now develop and operate guided walking trail and accommodation.

The Last Manned Lighthouse in Australia, the End of an Era

A luncheon was held on Friday the 25th, June 1999, at the Black Buffalo Hotel, in Hobart to commemorate the passing of the era of manned lighthouses.

An era that began with a large fire exhibited near the signal station at South Head, Port Jackson on the 15 January 1793 and ended when Chris Richter turned off the light at Maatsuyker Island on the 22 of August 1996 .

More than 90 former keepers and their families attended the celebration to mark the closing of an era that marks 178 years of manned light stations in Australia .

During the preparation for the luncheon it was realised that very few records existed of the lightkeepers and their families, so a book was provided for people to register their details and contact information for future occassions and reference.

In attendance was Mrs Eileen Thompson who was born on the 6th march 1920 she was born on Tasman Island. She was the only baby to be born on the island. Mrs. Thompson's Father George Johnston was the Head Light Keeper at the time and her grandfather Leslie was the islands first Head Keeper.

Chris Richter was presented with a certificate which for all time will give him the dubious title of the Last lighthouse keeper in Australia.

The day was significant because it also celebrated the retirement of 4 long standing staff from AMSA's Tasmanian Branch. A presentation was made to each of the retirees of a lighthouse specially carved from a piece of Tasmania's famous huon pine.

The lighthouse carved frorm a piece of huon pine. [Photograph: AMSA]
The lighthouse carved frorm a piece of huon pine.
[Photograph: AMSA]

Also on display were many of the artefacts held at the AMSA Depot in Hobart. They are part of a collection that is hoped will be housed in the new Tasmanian Maritime Museum. The museum will feature a dedicated lighthouse section which will eventually exhibit a replica of Tasman Islands Lantern room complete with revolving lens originally from Cape Sorell.

A similar function is to held in Brisbane next week.

Report on access to Point Perpendicular

[Stewart Brown]

Briefly, YES access is easy and well worth the visit, although maybe a bit harder following rains. We did it easily in wife's Benz the day following some rain. Note however the comments below relating to 110 days per annum where there is absolutely NO access to the peninsula or the lightstation.

Notes on Point Perpendicular:

  • Due to gunnery practice the Point Perpendicular access road is closed approx 110 days per year.
  • The road is usually open in NSW school holidays.
  • The Shoalhaven Tourist Centre can provide access information.
  • There is excellent bush camping (minimum facilities, but caravans permitted) at Honeymoon Bay.
  • Honeymoon Bay also provides safe swimming for young children in a delightful family atmosphere, but BYO everything.
  • There is a spot close by here where a boat to about 14 feet can be launched into Jervis Bay.
  • No ramp, just launch across reasonable rocks. This would be handy if you'd like photos of Point Perpendicular from the water without crossing Jervis Bay. See also below re tourist boats.
  • If you launch from Huskisson check your charts carefully re entrance to the river!!!!!!

Point Perpendicular is closed 110 days a year for gunnery practice. [Photograph: Ian Clifford]
Point Perpendicular is closed 110 days a year for gunnery practice.
[Photograph: Ian Clifford]

Access notes to lightstation:

  • Exit Nowra via Greenwell Point Road (Kalandar Street) and follow all tourist signs to Currarong.
  • Alternative route from south off Princes Highway on dirt road known locally as Forest Road, but mapped as Currarong Road (If using alternative route pass Jervis Bay Road turnoff, pass Falls Creek/Currambene Creek and watch for right turn).
  • Using either route watch for poorly marked right turn to Point Perpendicular Road just before you enter Currarong. The Ranger Station and gate is 100 metres in.
  • If gate is open there is no requirement to stop here unless camping is required. Caution over double set of speed bumps outside Ranger Station Set odometer to zero. 0.0 Ranger station, 3.7 Honeymoon Bay turnoff, 6.1 Watch the dip, 9.5 Carpark - no vehicle access beyond this point.
  • Continue on foot about 200 metres, be alert for snakes if warm weather.
  • When you reach perimeter fence at lighthouse property turn left and there is a pedestrian gate 40 metres along giving access to the grounds.
  • The only signs which specifically prohibit access relate to the old lightkeepers house which is occupied, and to the second keepers house adjacent.

Tourist boats:

  • Operate out of Huskisson on South side of Jervis Bay. These tours are essentially dolphin watch or whale watch trips but at least you get out towards Point Perpendicular. There is more than one operator, one of which will go right under the cliffs, so be sure to question them before paying up as to how close to the light they will be going.

Caloundra Makes it Home at Last!

[Roger Todd, Consulting Architect]

Roger Todd has infomed me that the the old Caloundra Lighthouse tower has been repaired and is now in position in the original location from which it was moved from over 30 years ago.

The first sequence of photos depicting the accident can be found in the June Bulletin.

This second sequence of photos show the repairing of the tower, its transportation and re-erection at the original site.

Work undertaken to stablise old Caloundra Tower. [Photograph Courtesy: Roger Todd]
Work undertaken to stablise old Caloundra Tower.
[Photograph Courtesy: Roger Todd]

Initial works undertaken to stabilise the structure and enable preliminary lifting so that repairs to the studs could proceed. A steel frame was constructed at door head height. This included a lifting point and tied together all the undamaged studs. The plywood bottom plate was partially fitted and reinforced, and other key elements within the structure were reinforced.

Lifting old Caloundra Tower on trestles for further repairs. [Photograph Courtesy: Roger Todd]
Lifting old Caloundra Tower on trestles for further repairs.
[Photograph Courtesy: Roger Todd]

The lighthouse is then lifted into position ready to be supported on trestles.

The old Caloundra Tower in position for further repairs. [Photograph Courtesy: Roger Todd]
The old Caloundra Tower in position for further repairs.
[Photograph Courtesy: Roger Todd]

The lighthouse is now in position to undertake structural repairs.

The studs are spliced together. [Photograph Courtesy: Roger Todd]
The studs are spliced together.
[Photograph Courtesy: Roger Todd]

The broken studs repaired by are splicing them back together.

Tower is placed on float ready for the journey. [Photograph Courtesy: Roger Todd]
Tower is placed on float ready for the journey.
[Photograph Courtesy: Roger Todd]

On the 11th June 99 the tower is positioned on the float ready for transport back to its original home.

Tower en-route to original site. [Photograph Courtesy: Roger Todd]
Tower en-route to original site.
[Photograph Courtesy: Roger Todd]

The tower en-route on the hill up to its original site in Canberra Tce.

The Glasshouse Mountains are in the background.

Only a few power lines needed to be lifted along the route.

Tower being lifted in the vertical position. [Photograph Courtesy: Roger Todd]
Tower being lifted in the vertical position.
[Photograph Courtesy: Roger Todd]

The tower being lifted into the vertical position in the carpark next to the 1967 concrete lighthouse. The steel trestles which had supported the tower in the horizontal position had been cut off prior to this lift.

The large crane needed to be repositioned before the final lift.

The start of the final lift. [Photograph Courtesy: Roger Todd]
The start of the final lift.
[Photograph Courtesy: Roger Todd]

The tower is being lifted over onto its original position. [Photograph Courtesy: Roger Todd]
The tower is being lifted over onto its original position.
[Photograph Courtesy: Roger Todd]

The tower is being lowered onto the new concrete base. [Photograph Courtesy: Roger Todd]
The tower is being lowered onto the new concrete base.
[Photograph Courtesy: Roger Todd]

The tower is lifted from the vertical position over vegetation and other obstacles. "Up up and away"

This is the really nevry bit. If anything went wrong we would have been in trouble.

"Touchdown". The tower is lowered onto and positioned on the previously prepared slab. The new slab and footing was built over the remains of the original 1996 concrete footing. Behind it is the new Caloundra Lighthouse built in 1967 and now in itself redundant.

The tower stands again on its original position. [Photograph Courtesy: Roger Todd]
The tower stands again on its original position.
[Photograph Courtesy: Roger Todd]

The lighthouse's lantern room is being be refurbished and will be back on the tower within a month.


Thanks to the Following People for Their Help in June:

Steve Clarke, AMSA (report)
Roger Todd (Photos & Info)
Annette Lecek (Photos)
Cathy Dunn (Info)
Nico Petiet (Photo)
John Lawley (Photos & Info)
Australia's Cultural Network (Search Service)
Mike Jenner (Photos)
Bernie Slattery (Book)
Jervis Sparks (Info)
Beverley Atkins, AMSA (Info)

Thanks to all the people who have put links to the site

Thanks to those who let me use their photos for thumbnails.


Regards until the August 99 Bulletin
Malcolm Macdonald

http://www.lighthouses.org.au/lights/


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