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Lighthouses of South Australia


State Indexes > SA > Troubridge Hill Lighthouse


The Troubridge Hill Lighthouse from the air
Photograph: Winsome Bonham

Troubridge Hill Lighthouse

The Troubridge Hill Lighthouse is unique because it is built from special wedge shaped bricks and has never been rendered or painted, creating a very distinctive day mark.


Operation

LOCATION: Latitude 35 10.1' S, Longitude 137 38.4' E (Map)
OPERATOR: Australian Maritime Safety Authority
CHARACTER: Group Flashing 2 in 15 sec
LIGHT SOURCE: 120v 1000w Tungsten Halogen Lamp
POWER SOURCE: Mains Electricity, Standby Diesel
INTENSITY: 257,000 cd
ELEVATION: 62 Metres
RANGE: 22 N Miles
HEIGHT: 32 Metres

The Troubridge Hill Lighthouse near Edithburgh [Photograph: Ed Kavaliunas]
The Troubridge Hill Lighthouse
Photograph: Ed Kavaliunas

The Troubridge Hill Lighthouse is on the heel of the Yorke Peninsula [Photograph: Ed Kavaliunas]
The Troubridge Hill Lighthouse is on the heel of the Yorke Peninsula
Photograph: Ed Kavaliunas


The Troubridge Hill [Photograph: Elizabeth Harford]
The Troubridge Hill Lighthouse
Photograph: Elizabeth Harford

History

The area is known for the treacherous Troubridge Shoal and nearby Marion Reef which by 1911 had claimed nineteen ships.

The Troubridge Hill Lighthouse was built in 1980 to replace the Troubridge Shoal Lighthouse as the major coastal light in the area.

The lighthouse is built from special wedge shaped clay bricks that were fired especially for this lighthouse. The lantern room is fabricated from fibreglass.

One of only a handful of brick lighthouses in Australia, the lighthouse is unique as the bricks have never been rendered or painted, making it a distinctive day mark.

The tower is designed to resist earthquakes and high winds. Both Troubridge Hill and Corny Point suffered from several earthquakes in the early 20th century.

It received a special award from the South Australian Clay Brick Association for an outstanding application of clay brickwork.

The light was built to be automatic and unmanned with the original apparatus being an array of sealed beam lanterns (similar to car headlights) that turned to create the character.

Due to the high maintenance cost, these has been replaced with a more traditional rotating lens and electric lantern.

The establishment of this light saw the demanning and downgrading of the nearby Troubridge Shoal Lighthouse.


The Troubridge Hill is built from special wedge shaped bricks [Photograph: Ed Kavaliunas]
The Troubridge Hill is built from special wedge shaped bricks
Photograph: Ed Kavaliunas


Access

The lighthouse reserve is accessible to the public. The road is of a good grade, gravel for the 8 kilometres to the lighthouse. There are no tours.

The Troubridge Hill Lighthouse From Clan Ranald Memorial [Photograph: Annette Flottwell]
The Troubridge Hill Lighthouse From Clan Ranald Memorial
Photograph: Annette Flotwell


The Surrounding Area


Special Thanks to:

  • Bob Duthie for Clippings
  • Ed Kavaliunas for Photographs
  • Edithburgh Museum for Clippings
  • Elizabeth Harford for Photographs
  • Annette Flotwell for Photographs
  • Winsome Bonham for Photograph

Sources:

  • Adelaide Advertiser
  • Alan Foote
  • AMSA
  • Brian Lord
  • Yorke Peninsula Country Times

Page last updated:
Page created:
27/05/00
27/05/00

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